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LARSEN, Hans Peter

LARSEN, Hans Peter

Male 1853 - 1938  (85 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name LARSEN, Hans Peter 
    Born 30 Sep 1853  Gunderød, Karlebo, Frederiksberg, Denmark Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 9 Dec 1853 
    Gender Male 
    WAC 1 Dec 1873  EHOUS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Died 8 Dec 1938  Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 11 Dec 1938  Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I21321  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr.
    Last Modified 20 Jul 2020 

    Father WRAY, 2nd Baronet John ,   c. 27 Nov 1586, Louth, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Dec 1655, Glentworth, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 69 years) 
    Mother BETHELL, Grisilla ,   b. Abt 1589, Ellerton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1653, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 64 years) 
    Married 7 Sep 1607  Ellerton, Yorkshire, Enland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F28435  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family CROWTHER, Catherine ,   b. 11 Mar 1856, Alton, Madison, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jul 1946, Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Married 15 Dec 1881  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2020 
    Family ID F8338  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsWAC - 1 Dec 1873 - EHOUS Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 15 Dec 1881 - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 Dec 1938 - Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 11 Dec 1938 - Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Hans Peter Larsen
    Hans Peter Larsen
    https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-233-37047-169-53/dist.jpg?ctx=ArtCtxPublic
    https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-233-37047-169-53/dist.jpg?ctx=ArtCtxPublic
    Hans Peter Larsen family
    Hans Peter Larsen family
    Hans Peter Larsen and Family: Hans Peter, William Wallace, Catherine Pearson Crowther, ?, Myrtle, Annie Janet Larsen
    https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-303-41013-380-26/dist.jpg?ctx=ArtCtxPublic
    https://familysearch.org/patron/v2/TH-303-41013-380-26/dist.jpg?ctx=ArtCtxPublic
    AMBROSE SHURTZ
    dist.jpg?ctx=ArtCtxPublic
    As a young man

  • Notes 
    • History of Hans Peter Larsen

      Hans Peter Larsen (Nielsen)
      Timeline
      Birth: 30 September 1853 Gunderod, Karlebo, Fredricksborg, Denmark
      Christening: 9 December 1853 Fredricksborg, Denmark
      Baptism: 1 January 1863
      Confirmation: 1 January 1863
      Ordained a Priest:
      Ordained an Elder:
      Initiatory: 1 December 1873 Endowment House
      Endowment: 1 December 1873 Endowment House
      Sealing to Parents: 27 Jan 1909 Manti Temple
      Marriage:
      Sealing to Spouse: 15 December 1881 Endowment House
      Death: 8 December 1938
      Burial: 11 December 1938 Manti, Sanpete, Utah


      Catherine Crowther-Larsen
      Timeline
      Birth: 11 March 1856 Alton, Godfrey County, Illinois or Murphysboro, Jackson, Illinois.
      Christening:
      Baptism: 1 January 1867 or 25 January 1867
      Confirmation: 1 January 1867
      Initiatory: 15 December 1881 Endowment House
      Endowment: 15 December 1881 Endowment House
      Sealing to Parents: 9 September 1920 Manti Temple
      Marriage:
      Sealing to Spouse: 15 December 1881 Endowment House
      Death: 22 July 1946 Manti, Sanpete, Utah
      Burial: 26 July 1946 Manti, Sanpete, Utah



      Hans Peter Larsen was born in Gunnerod, Fredrick’s, Denmark, the of 30 September 1853 in Gunderod, Karlebo, Fredricksborg, Denmark. He was christened on 9 Dec 1853. He was baptized into the LDS church on 6 Feb 1863. He was endowed on 1 Dec 1873. He was sealed to parents on 27 Jan 1909. He died on 8 Dec 1938 in Manti, Sanpete, Utah. He was buried on 11 Dec 1938 in Manti, Sanpete, Utah. The first son of Niels and Anne Hansen Larsen. His father was moderately well off so he had the advantages of the best schools of that time. He must have been a good student judging his accomplishments, because in his eleventh year he was able to read and write not only the Danish language but also the Norwegian, Swedish, German and some French. When he came to Utah he soon learned the Indian language well enough to converse with the Indians.

      The Latter Day Saints Missionaries came to their home and taught them the Restored Gospel; they were converted and joined the church. After joining the church the relatives of both Niels and Anne turned against them and made life as miserable for them as they could. Grandfather had a winter home in Copenhagen and a farm out near Gunnerod where they lived during the Spring, Summer, and Fall season. He was a retired army officer in the Danish army who served in the War with Germany.

      In 1864 they sold their property and decided to go to Utah and live with the body of the church. They crossed the ocean in a ship loaded with Danish emigrants. When they arrived in New York, Grandfather bought two teams of horses, a new wagon, harnesses and a saddle and horse for my father to ride from New York to Utah. They arrived in Salt Lake City in the fall of 1864 and were sent by President Brigham Young to Manti to help build up that colony.

      Father's 11th birthday was soon after they arrived at Manti. His father got some land and proceeded to build a home and go to farming. Father worked with his Father at farming and what other work there was to do.

      Father was the only child in the family until 7 August 1870, when Lewis was born. He was seventeen years old at the time. Then the 9th of April 1973 grandfather died leaving my father to take care of his mother and Lewis who was not quite three years old. He did a good job and succeeded well and was well respected in the community. On the 15th of December 1881 he married Catherine Crowther of Fountain Green in the Endowment House on the 15 of December 1881, Salt Lake City, Utah.

      He was a pioneer and did all he could in the development of Manti and vicinity. He accompanied Brigham Young on several of his trips south to St. George. He was very active in social circles. I will quote an article from "Heart Throbs of the West', Vol. 2 pg. 314-315.

      "H.P. Larsen, a Danish boy, who came to Manti in 1964 was a great lover of music and the dance. When quite a young man he visited Salt Lake City and attended a dance here he was impressed with the graceful execution of the square dances, how the calls followed the beat of the music and how the rhythm was blended into the movements. Before going home he bought a book of "Calls" and when he returned he proceeded to introduce them. He became an excellent Caller, often moving among the sets as he called, showing couples who were confused the proper positions to take. He called in all the dances where the Western show orchestra played and long after they had disbanded. Through him, refinement and grace was given the square dance. Lifting it from the class of the hoe-down to a thing of rhythm and beauty".

      He called at nearly all the dances in Manti until shortly before his death on the 8th of December 1938. For a number of years while Castello Springs Resort in Utah County was at its best the Lowry orchestra played at many of the dances and he always went with them to do the calling. On these occasions a special train was run from Manti to Castello spring resort.

      BIOGRAPHY OF HANS PETER LARSEN
      By Ruth C Nelson Stubbs, granddaughter compiled by Grant N. Stubbs, Great Grandson Hans Peter Larsen was born 30 Sept. 1853, in Gunnerod, Fredrick’s, Denmark, the first son of Niels Larsen and Annie Hansen. Hans's father Niels Larsen being a Captain in the Danish Army was well to do financially in Denmark, but when they decided to come to America, he loaned thousands of dollars to the immigrants coming over at that time. Many of them never repaid the loans because some died on the way over, or soon after getting to America never had the money to pay him back. The family arrived in Salt Lake City in 1864 and went directly to Manti, Sanpete, Utah, where his home was until his death in 1938.

      When in Denmark, Grandpa was known as Hans Linen, because he always wore linen suits as a boy. The family joined the church in 1863 in Denmark. At that time Hans’s father’s family disowned them, and the treatment they received was the reason they decided to sell out and move to America.

      Hans was 17 years old when his brother, Law Larsen was born; he became a lawyer, lived in Manti, Utah and had a farm in Christenburg, Utah.

      Hans married Catherine Crowther, December 15, 1881, in the Salt Lake endowment house. The endowment house was used for eternal marriages before the temples were built, after their marriage they made their home in Manti, Utah, where their fiends always called them Hans and Kate.

      At the time of his marriage to Catherine, Hans was 6'2" tall, 180 pounds, medium brown hair, later in life his hair was thin and gray. He had blue gray eyes. Hans hurt his leg in a mowing machine, the doctors wanted to cut it off, he said, no he would not let them, for 25-27 years his leg hurt him, draining all the time, this caused him to walk with a limp. When he would come in from work, and sit down, the pain was always there.

      At the time of his marriage Hans engaged in farming and raising livestock, he was a good farmer and very good with animals, which he always loved.

      Hans home and lot was always neat and clean, the place was beautiful, he liked to putter and do carpenter work also, he helped as a carpenter and worker on the Manti Temple when it was being built, along with his son, Wallace.

      There was a grainery in the back of their house, that they used for a wash house, it had a table in it that grandpa used as a work bench for his carpenter work, he was always fixing furniture and other things.

      They always had men boarders in their home, these men worked at the courthouse, some were teachers. One year they had a women school teacher living in their home, Grandma said, "I'll have a dozen men but I can't stand women boarders, they are always washing and ironing, washing their hair she couldn't stand this as she wanted to get on with her work, some of the men that were boarders at their home were, Vaiden Mortensen, Rulan Mortensen, Frank Anderson, Hans Christensen.

      Hans called dances, he was very efficient at this and people loved to have him call the dances. Grandpa had many friends and people loved him and enjoyed his company. Their first son and child, Hans Nfilton, was born 23 Sept. 1882, in Manti, Utah, he died the 28 October 1885. Their second son, George Niels, was born 13 October 1884, in Manti, Utah, he later married Martha May Block, 14 October 1909, George died 3.

      October 1972. Their third son, William Wallace was born 11 June 1886, also in Manti, Utah, he married Stephine Wells McAllister the first of September 1909. Their first daughter and fourth child was born 15, November 1888 in Manti, Utah, they named her Myrtle, she married Lawrence Niels Nelson, 10 June 1908 in the Manti Temple, she died 19 January 1945 in the L.D. S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. Their second daughter, Annie Janet was born 17 August 1890 in Manti, Utah. She married Alma Nfidgley Thomas 9 May 1928. She died 23 March 1967. Their sixth child and fourth son, Robert Moriand was born 3 June 1893 in Manti, Utah. He died 23 March 1909 in Manti, Utah. Their seventh and last son was born November 10, 1899 at Manti, Utah. He died 23 March 1923; they named him Lorin Ward Larsen.

      Grandpa was a very religious man, with a strong testimony of the gospel. He went to church and to the temple alone for many years. He was always on time to everything. For many years he was an ordinance worker in the Manti Temple. He said, "One day they had just started a session, and was going to pass into the next room the door wouldn’t open, he tried it three times, a worker finally said, there is someone here that shouldn't be here, would you please leave, he said this three times, finally a couple rose and left the room, then the door opened and they went on with the session.

      Front row: Hans Peter Larsen, Lorrin Ward Larsen, Catherine Crowther Larsen
      Back row: Robert Morland Larsen, Myrtle Larsen, Annie Janet Larsen

      On June 5, 1917, Grandpa took me to the temple to be baptized and confirmed, he let me go up the winding stairs, up into the towers on each end of the temple, and let me walk across the Temple on the top between the towers. He did a lot of temple work and genealogy for his family and his Danish relatives. One time he had me do II 5 names for baptism and another time 90 female names all on his family lines. Grandpa was the custodian of the Manti South Ward building for a few years. He was also the sexton or caretaker for the Manti City Cemetery, when his son Robert died at the age of 16, he couldn’t dig the grave. He was the one that planted all the pine trees in the Manta Cemetery. He once said as he was digging a grave, he heard singing, he looked north and a large group of people, all dressed white, were walking out of the cemetery.

      Grandpa, always drove around with a buggy, this is how he visited his daughter, Myrtle, every day the children would see him coming down the street and say, "here comes Grandpa," he would come in, walking slow and see how Myrtle was feeling, later he got a model T Ford coop, it had one seat, he would come driving it up, with Grandma in it, and say "Whoa" for it to stop. He will always be known for his love, kindness to everyone, he treated all his family and the grandchildren the same.

      Hans Peter LARSEN was born on 30 Sep 1853 in Gunderod, Karlebo, Fredricksborg,
      Denmark. He was christened on 9 Dec 1853. He was baptized into the LDS church on 6
      Feb 1863. He was endowed on 1 Dec 1873. He was sealed to parents on 27 Jan 1909. He
      died on 8 Dec 1938 in Manti, Sanpete, Utah. Hans Peter Larsen, died 8 December 1938 in Manti, Utah, He was buried 11 December 1938 in the Manti City Cemetery. Ruth C Nelson Stubbs




      Stubbs Nelson Hart Pickett, Tervort Wride, and Davis Bradshaw

      Catherine Crowther was born March 11, 1856, at Alton, Illinois, to George Crowther, who was born November 18, 1826 at Dorley or Iron bridge near London, England. She died April 16, 1895 at Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah. Her Mother Janet Wiley, was born 29 October 1825 at Kilberney 'Ayrshire, Scotland. She died December 22, 1904 at Fountain Green, Utah. She was so small when she was a baby that she could fit in a quart cup. (This was a quart container similar and used as a measuring cup with a handle and spout. it was made of metal or aluminum.)
      At the time of Catherine Crowther-Larsen's birth, the Mormon's were being persecuted. They left in June 1857 for Utah, with a company of Saints under the direction of Israel Evans, who had organized a hand Cart company. Grandma was fifteen months old when they started the long hard march across the plains. Catherine and her sister Robena, who was seven years and five months old at the time of starting rode on the hand carts, the loads were heavy and had to be pulled through sand and mud, over hill and over a thousand miles to Salt Lake City.
      After a three-month trip across the plains, they arrived in Salt Lake City, just ahead of the Johnson Army. One week after they arrived President Brigham Young called Catherine's father George Crowther to go to Echo Canyon to guard against the army of Colonel Johnson. While he was away, the church ordered the Big Move as it was called. Janet Crowther and her two little girls were moved to Payson when the guard was mustered out it took the husband and their father two weeks to find them.
      As a little girl Catherine went with her parents from one place to another where her parents were called to go by President Brigham Young, and help colonize. They moved to Wales, Sanpete Co., in 1860, to Moroni in 1863, to Monroe in May 1864 they lived in dugouts that had been there family home in which they lived when she was 8 years old. They dug holes in the side of the foothills. They were damp and unhealthy, and nearly the whole colony became ill with Typhoid Fever. Because of this and the Indian troubles, the church leaders asked them to return to the Sanpete settlement about 1864 to about 1867 they went to Manti, where they stayed for two months and then to Fountain Green where they made a permanent home.
      Catherine was now eleven years old and had to work in gathering thistles, mustard greens, sego roots or bulbs and mushrooms to be used for food for the family. Catherine would fight grasshoppers and do work around the house. Catherine fingers were nimble so she was assigned the task of selecting the long fibers of wool and twisting them into threads to sew the clothing they made from cloth woven by her mother.
      Catherine's education was such as could be obtained from the schools at that time. The school terms were short and curriculum consisted principally of the three R's (reading, riting and rithmetic). In these she did well and with the practical experience gained through the College of hard Knocks, she became fairly well educated. As a young woman she would help spin and weave, cook and sew, work in the gardens and fields with her father, help neighbors in sickness and need of assistance. Catherine was very active in church and civic affairs at that time. Catherine always had the ability to make and keep friends; she practiced fair play to all.
      On December 15, 1881, Catherine married Hans Peter Larsen in the Salt Lake Endowment House, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The endowment house was used at that time for eternal marriages until the temples could be built. Hans Peter Larsen was the son of Niels Larsen and Annie Hansen Larsen. He with his parents joined the Church in 1863 while in their home at Gunnerod, Denmark. After they joined the church his father's people disowned them, and the treatment they received caused them to sell out and move to America. Han's father had been a captain in the Danish army, and was well fixed financially there. But when he decided in 1864, to come to America he loaned thousands of dollars to the immigrants coming over at that time. Many of them never repaid the loans because some died on the way or soon after and others never had the money ahead to pay with.
      At the time of her marriage she was 5'2" tall, with medium brown hair, gray-green eyes, a slender build, the grandchildren thought she was kind of heavy, but when she would take off her petticoats, 7 or 8 of them, she was not so. She always wore a long sleeve to the waist, dresses, to her ankles.
      Grandma was so exact in all that she did; she didn't believe that anyone should be idle. We were always given something to do. She always seemed to know when the job was finished, so she could give another job to be done.
      Grandma washed on Mondays, (start at 4 A.M.) always had one wash out on the line when we would go passed on the way to school, Iron on Tuesday. She would make the children take off their stockings and would mend them, when they were on their way to school. After school, she would have a job or errand for the kids to do, she would give them a slice of bread and butter to eat, tell them, to go home and help their mother. She also had them churn butter for her. She would always have me wash and mop her kitchen floor, which she disliked to do because the floor was inlaid linoleum it was a dark green and dark beige, it always had to be done on your knees, when it was dry, she would have you put linoleum oil on it. She had a real system to house cleaning. It was always started in April and completed by Memorial Day, inside and out. On the last of October, she would start all over again, and everything was done again and finished by Thanksgiving every nook and corner.
      Grandma was always cooking, because of the boarders they had in the home, because of this, everyone helped to push the washing machine.
      She was very compassionate, always taking food to those who needed help or those who had a funeral.
      Grandma was an exceptionally good cook, she canned everything, if she got a quart of raspberries out of the garden, and some were left, she would put them up in jam, always something in her windows, currant jelly, raspberries, and fruit.
      Grandma always expected to be obeyed when she spoke, she always said, "it's better to wear out than to rust out," She was always busy doing something, never idle, everything she did was systematically. She always had boarder's in her home, men working at the courthouse, schoolteachers, etc. One time she had a lady school teacher boarder, for one winter, she always said women were a nuisance, always wanting to wash their hair, take a bath, men boarders were a lot easier to have in the home. She always said, " If anything is worth-doing at all, it was worth doing well” She told everyone that helped her this saying.
      She was always a very fine cook and an exceptionally good manager; she could prepare a meal so quickly. She was always taking bread to others in the neighborhood, or those who were ill. I was sent to the bakery one time for a dozen cinnamon rolls, when I got back, she counted them, and there were only eleven, she accused me of eating the one, which I wouldn't dared to eat. She sent me back to the bakery, I told Mrs. Ruesch, she said I had eaten it; I was getting mad at this time and held my ground. Finally she gave me the roll. When I got back to grandma's she said, let this be a lesson to you, don't trust anyone, and keep your eyes open to what is going on, I was twelve at this time.
      She was a happy woman and good hearted, but had a mind of her own. As she grew older, she still wore the older style clothing and always wore an apron, but always was neat and tidy. She wore her hair bobbed on the top of her head. She loved kids and everyday she'd go out to the gate and wait for the kids to come home from school, talking and laughing with her own and other children. She'd wear a black shawl around her shoulders. She always had a treat for the kids when they came to visit. She would let the children pick up the walnuts in front of her house.
      Catherine's daughter Myrtle remembers the summer of 1945 when they went to Monroe and showed her husband the dugouts that had been her and her family home in which they lived when she was 8 years old. They dug holes in the side of the foothills. They were damp and unhealthy, and nearly the whole colony became ill with Typhoid Fever. Because of this and the Indian troubles, the church leaders asked them to return to the Sanpete settlement about 1864.
      When I was married in the Temple, Grandma went to the temple with us; this is the first time she had been back to the temple since she was married in the Endowment house in 1881. As she went through the temple, her cousin, Mary Anderson, wife of President Lewis R. Anderson, Kate, told her you are more trouble than anyone; you would think it was you getting married.
      Grandma traveled very little, once a couple of times to Wales, Utah to see her daughter Jennie, She really didn't like to sew, but used up all scraps of material she could, into aprons or something.
      Their first child and son was born 21 Sept. 1882 in Manti, Utah, they named him Hans Milton, died Oct. 28, 1885 of pneumonia at the age of three; The second son was born 13 October 1 884 in Manti, Utah, they named him George Niels, he married Martha May Block, October 14, 1909, George died 3 Oct. 1972. Their third son, William Wallace was born 11 June 1886, also in Manti, Utah, He married Stephine Wells McAllister the 1st of Sept. 1909, Their first daughter and fourth child was born 15 Nov. 1888 in Manti, Utah, they named her Myrtle, she married Lawrence Niels Nelson, 10 June 1908 in the Manti Temple. She died 18 January 1945 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Their second daughter, Annie Janet was born 17 August 1890 in Manti, Utah, She married Alma Midgley Thomas, 9 May 1928. She died 23 March 1967. Their sixth child and fourth son, Robert Moriand, was born 3 June 1893 in Manti, Utah. He died 23 March 1909 at Manti, Utah of quick pneumonia; Their seventh and last son was born November 10, 1899 at Manti, Utah, they named him Lorrin Ward, he died March 15, 1923 in Manti, of either pneumonia following an operation for appendicitis. Lorin Ward was in the service of his country in the world war and at his death his mother's name was added to the list of "Gold Star” mothers.
      Shortly before she died, my mother and Aunt Annie Janet Larsen's were caring for her because she was so sick and could not care for herself. She was so bad that jenny sent my mother to get the Elders. After they gave her a blessing, within 15 minutes, she settled down and slept about 3 hours. Her faith in the Priesthood and Church was so strong and was an important part of her throughout her life.
      She always had that spirit of wanting to help others. Her ideals were the same throughout her life. "It is better to suffer wrong than to do wrong's " He who serves is happier than he who receives services” Hans spent a lot of time at the Manti Temple doing Temple Work. They enjoyed dancing and Hans was known all around for his calling of square dances.
      She died at the age of 90, July 22, 1946 in Manti, Sanpete, Utah. She was buried in the Manti City cemetery 25 July 1946.

      Written by Ruth C. Nelson Stubbs