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MURE, Sir Adam

MURE, Sir Adam

Male 1293 - 1380  (87 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name MURE, Adam 
    Prefix Sir 
    Born 1293  Rowallan Castle, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _TAG Request Submitted for Permission 
    _TAG Temple 
    Died 1380  Rowallan Castle, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I49879  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr., Lucy Mack
    Last Modified 11 Jun 2020 

    Family DANZIELSTOUR, Joanna Janet ,   b. 1295, Rowallan, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1330, Renfrewshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years) 
    Children 
    +1. MURE, Countess Elizabeth ,   b. 2 Mar 1320, Rowallan Castle, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 May 1355, Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2020 
    Family ID F21144  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    AMBROSE SHURTZ
    Battle of Halidon Hill
    As a young man

  • Notes 
    • Hugh, 4th Earl of Ross, was killed at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333. The following is a brief history of the Battle of Halidon Hill:
      The Battle of Halidon Hill (19 July 1333) was fought during the Second War of Scottish Independence. Scottish forces under Sir Archibald Douglas were heavily defeated by the English forces of King Edward III of England on unfavourable terrain while trying to relieve Berwick-upon-Tweed....Edward and his army took up position on Halidon Hill, a small rise of some 600 ft. two miles to the north-west of Berwick, which gives an excellent view of the town and surrounding countryside. From this vantage point he was able to dominate all of the approaches to the beleaguered port. Any attempt by Douglas to by-pass the hill and march directly on Berwick would have been quickly overwhelmed. Crossing the Tweed to the west of the English position, the Guardian reached the town of Duns on 19 July. On the following day he approached Halidon Hill from the north-west, ready to give battle on ground chosen by his enemy. It was a catastrophic decision. The Book of Pluscarden, a Scots chronicle, describes the scene:

      They (the Scots) marched towards the town with great display, in order of battle, and recklessly, stupidly and inadvisedly chose a battle ground at Halidon Hill, where there was a marshy hollow between the two armies, and where a great downward slope, with some precipices, and then again a rise lay in front of the Scots, before they could reach the field where the English were posted.

      The approach was observed by Henry de Beaumont, who would have advised Edward of the tactics that brought victory at Dupplin Moor when the two met at York the previous December. The order of battle now employed mirrored those used at Dupplin, with some variations owing to superior strength. The army was divided into three divisions, comprising infantry, men-at-arms and knights. All made ready to fight on foot in a defensive position. The left was commanded by Balliol; the centre by Edward; and the right by the king's uncle Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Lord Marshal of England. Standing on the flanks of each division were six supporting wings of archers, armed with a decisive weapon: the English longbow. The bowmen projected slightly forward in a wedge formation to offer maximum use of supporting crossfire, an arrangement later adopted at Crécy. Edward was required to take no further action: for if Douglas refused to give battle, as caution and good sense demanded, Berwick would fall by default.

      Douglas' army was also arranged in three divisions, drawn up in traditional schiltron formation: the Guardian commanded the left; Robert Stewart, the future king, commanded the centre; and John Randolph, 3rd Earl of Moray the right. As Pluscarden says, to engage the English they had to advance downhill, cross a large area of marshy ground, and then climb up the northern slope of Halidon Hill. Although the Scots spearmen had proved their worth against cavalry at Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn, the battles of Dupplin Moor and Falkirk had shown how vulnerable they were to arrows. Not only was the ground bad, but it must have been obvious to the Guardian as he looked towards the massed ranks of Edward's archers that this was not going to be a cavalry battle. The prudent course of action would have been to withdraw and wait for a better opportunity to fight; but this would mean the automatic loss of Berwick. The Scots were now to fight one of the most disadvantageous battles in their history.
      (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Halidon_Hill)

      Hugh, 4th Earl of Ross had married Maud Bruce (also known as Matilda), sister of Robert the Bruce, but Hugh was killed at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333. (http://www.scotsconnection.com/clan_crests/Ross.htm)