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VIELLES, Humphrey de

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    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Gallaway (1185-1234)
    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Gallaway (1185-1234)
    Birth: 1185
    Wigtown
    Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
    Death: Feb., 1234, Scotland

    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. He was a "leading thirteenth-century Scottish magnate. As the hereditary Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland, he was one of the most influential men in the Kingdom of Scotland and Irish Sea zone." [Wikipedia]

    Eldest son of Roland FitzUhtred, Lord of Galloway and Helen de Morville. Grandson of Uhtred and great grandson of Fergus, the King of Galloway, who was married to a daughter of King Henry I of England. He was the grandfather of King John Balliol of Scotland.

    Alan married a de Lacy, thought to be a daughter of Roger de Lacy, Constable of Chester. They had several children including boys who died young:
    * Daughter, died as Scottish hostage 1213
    * Helen, wife of Roger de Quincy

    Alan's second wife was Margaret de Huntingdon, the daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon by his wife, Matilda of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. His children with Margaret were:
    * Christina, wife of William de Forz
    * Dervorguilla of Galloway, wife of John Balliol, 5th Baron de Balliol
    * Thomas, died young

    A third wife, no issue, was Rose de Lacy. He also had an illegitimate son named Thomas.

    Alan was the most powerful and influential man in Scotland, known for his military strength and army size, his extensive holdings in Scotland, Ireland and England, affected the decisions of Scottish kings and was one of John Lackland's advisors concerning the Magna Carta. He was the last legitimate ruler of Galloway, and his family was remarkable for their religious contributions. His great grandfather founded Dundrennan Abbey where he was buried, and Alan founded Tongland Abbey. Alan accompanied Robert de Brus and Walter FitzAlan on a pilgrimage to Canterbury to witness the placing of the remains of Saint Thomas.

    Alan's life was incredibly full, complicated and a combination of Gaelic, Frankish, Scottish and English events. No simple bio could possibly describe it all.

    After his death, the position of Constable went to his son in law, Roger de Quincy. His only surviving son, the illegitimate Thomas, might have ruled Galloway had the Scottish crown not disallowed it by seizing the lordship and splitting the lands between his daughters, sans the Irish holdings which were given to the Bissets at an unknown point.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Roland de Galloway (1164 - 1200)
    Elena de Morville Galloway (____ - 1217)

    Children:
    Elena McDonald Of Galloway (1208 - 1245)*
    Devorguilla de Galloway (1218 - 1290)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Dundrennan Abbey
    Dundrennan
    Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

    Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: Jan 10, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 63993118
    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway (1185-1234) buried at Dundrennan Abbey, Dundrennan, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway (1185-1234) buried at Dundrennan Abbey, Dundrennan, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway
    Birth: 1185
    Wigtown
    Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland
    Death: Feb., 1234, Scotland

    Alan FitzRoland, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. He was a "leading thirteenth-century Scottish magnate. As the hereditary Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland, he was one of the most influential men in the Kingdom of Scotland and Irish Sea zone." [Wikipedia]

    Eldest son of Roland FitzUhtred, Lord of Galloway and Helen de Morville. Grandson of Uhtred and great grandson of Fergus, the King of Galloway, who was married to a daughter of King Henry I of England. He was the grandfather of King John Balliol of Scotland.

    Alan married a de Lacy, thought to be a daughter of Roger de Lacy, Constable of Chester. They had several children including boys who died young:
    * Daughter, died as Scottish hostage 1213
    * Helen, wife of Roger de Quincy

    Alan's second wife was Margaret de Huntingdon, the daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon by his wife, Matilda of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. His children with Margaret were:
    * Christina, wife of William de Forz
    * Dervorguilla of Galloway, wife of John Balliol, 5th Baron de Balliol
    * Thomas, died young

    A third wife, no issue, was Rose de Lacy. He also had an illegitimate son named Thomas.

    Alan was the most powerful and influential man in Scotland, known for his military strength and army size, his extensive holdings in Scotland, Ireland and England, affected the decisions of Scottish kings and was one of John Lackland's advisors concerning the Magna Carta. He was the last legitimate ruler of Galloway, and his family was remarkable for their religious contributions. His great grandfather founded Dundrennan Abbey where he was buried, and Alan founded Tongland Abbey. Alan accompanied Robert de Brus and Walter FitzAlan on a pilgrimage to Canterbury to witness the placing of the remains of Saint Thomas.

    Alan's life was incredibly full, complicated and a combination of Gaelic, Frankish, Scottish and English events. No simple bio could possibly describe it all.

    After his death, the position of Constable went to his son in law, Roger de Quincy. His only surviving son, the illegitimate Thomas, might have ruled Galloway had the Scottish crown not disallowed it by seizing the lordship and splitting the lands between his daughters, sans the Irish holdings which were given to the Bissets at an unknown point.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Roland de Galloway (1164 - 1200)
    Elena de Morville Galloway (____ - 1217)

    Children:
    Elena McDonald Of Galloway (1208 - 1245)*
    Devorguilla de Galloway (1218 - 1290)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Dundrennan Abbey
    Dundrennan
    Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland

    Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: Jan 10, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 63993118

  • Name VIELLES, Humphrey de 
    Born 980  Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Sep 1044  Préaux, Aisne, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Oct 1044  Préaux, Indre, Centre, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    WAC 15 Dec 1921 
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I32158  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Father HARCOURT, Tourude de ,   b. Abt 940, Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Préaux, Aisne, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother CREPON, Wevia Duceline de ,   b. Abt 942, Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1002, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 60 years) 
    Married Abt 979  France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 22 Jun 1962, ARIZO.
    Family ID F9631  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family HAIE, Aubrey de La ,   b. 984, Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Sep 1045, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 1010  France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. BEAUMONT, Seigneur Roger de ,   b. 10 Oct 1022, Beauchamp, Mande, Basse Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1094, Préaux, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     2. VIELLES, Dunelme de ,   b. 1022, Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. BEAUMONT, Robert ,   b. Abt 1011, Beaumont, Allier, Auvergne, France Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. VIELLES, William de ,   b. 1020, Pont-Audemer, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1094, Préaux, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F17691  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Humphrey (or Honfroy, Onfroi or Umfrid) de Vieilles[1] (died c. 1050) was the first holder of the "grand honneur" of Beaumont-le-Roger, one of the most important groups of domains in eastern Normandy[2] and the founder of the House of Beaumont. He was married to Albreda or Alberée de la Haye Auberie.

      His early life and origins are the subject of much discussion. As reported by later Norman chronicler Robert of Torigni, he was son of Thorold de Pont-Audemer and grandson of a Torf, from whose name derived that of the village of Tourville-sur-Pont-Audemer.[3] Humphrey's mother, according to Robert of Torigni, was Duvelina, sister of Gunnora, concubine of Richard I, Duke of Normandy. Thus Humphrey and his Beaumont descendants were kinsmen of the Norman Dukes and other members of the early Anglo-Norman nobility similarly descended from Gunnora's kindred.

      Besides Beaumont-le-Roger, he had lands dispersed through the whole of Normandy, in Cotentin, in Hiémois, in the Pays d'Auge, in Basse Seine (Vatteville-la-Rue), in Évrecin (Normanville) and in Vexin normand (Bouafles). These lands originated in the favour of the dukes Richard II and Robert II, from confiscated church lands. The "honneur" of Beaumont was, for example, constituted from the remains of the lands of the abbey of Bernay.[4] On the other hand, the possessions around Pont-Audemer came to him by family inheritance.

      In 1034, he 'founded' (or, rather, restored) the monastery at Préaux, a few kilometres from Pont-Audemer, with monks from the Saint-Wandrille.

      During the minority of Duke William the Bastard, Roger I of Tosny, holder of the "honneur" of Conches, attacked Humphrey's domains. But around 1040, Humphrey's son, Roger de Beaumont, met and defeated Roger in battle, during which Roger of Tosny was killed.

      Humphrey (or Honfroy, Onfroi or Umfrid) de Vieilles[1] (died c. 1050) was the first holder of the "grand honneur" of Beaumont-le-Roger, one of the most important groups of domains in eastern Normandy[2] and the founder of the House of Beaumont. He was married to Albreda or Alberée de la Haye Auberie.
      His early life and origins are the subject of much discussion. As reported by later Norman chronicler Robert of Torigni, he was son of Thorold de Pont-Audemer and grandson of a Torf, from whose name derived that of the village of Tourville sur Pont Audemer.[3] Humphrey's mother, according to Robert of Torigni, was Duvelina, sister of Gunnora, concubine of Richard I, Duke of Normandy. Thus Humphrey and his Beaumont descendants were kinsmen of the Norman Dukes and other members of the early Anglo-Norman nobility similarly descended from Gunnora's kindred.
      Besides Beaumont-le-Roger, he had lands dispersed through the whole of Normandy, in Cotentin, in Hiémois, in the Pays d'Auge, in Basse Seine (Vatteville-la-Rue), in Évrecin (Normanville) and in Vexin normand (Bouafles). These lands originated in the favour of the dukes Richard II and Robert II, from confiscated church lands. The "honneur" of Beaumont was, for example, constituted from the remains of the lands of the abbey of Bernay.[4] On the other hand, the possessions around Pont-Audemer came to him by family inheritance.
      In 1034, he 'founded' (or, rather, restored) the monastery at Préaux, a few kilometres from Pont-Audemer, with monks from the Saint-Wandrille.
      During the minority of Duke William the Bastard, Roger I of Tosny, holder of the "honneur" of Conches, attacked Humphrey's domains. But around 1040, Humphrey's son, Roger de Beumont, met and defeated Roger in battle, during which Roger was killed.
      Contents
      [hide]
      1 Family and descendants
      2 Notes and references
      3 Sources
      4 External links
      [edit] Family and descendants
      Basse-Normandie flag.svg Normandy portal
      His known children by his wife Albreda or Alberée de la Haye Auberie:
      Robert, the elder, assassinated by Roger de Clères[5] after 1066 and buried at the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Préaux;
      Roger de Beaumont, known as le Barbe († 1094), who succeeded his father.
      Dunelma (perhaps a corrupted form of Duvelina, the name of her grandmother) sister of Roger of Beaumont and mother of a daughter who was a Nun at Saint-Léger de Préaux
      One other possible child :
      Guillaume de Beaumont, Monk at the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Préaux
      [edit] Notes and references
      ^ Vieilles is the name of a former village, now merged with Beaumont-le-Roger
      ^ Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xe-XIe siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004, p.216-217. Among the other grands honneurs of the Pays d'Ouche, were those of Breteuil and of Conches
      ^ Robert of Torigni relates that Thorold was brother of Turquetil, the father of Harcourt family founder Ansketil de Harcourt.
      ^ Veronica Gazeau, Monachisme et aristocratie au XIe siècle : l'exemple de la famille de Beaumont,, PhD thesis, University of Caen, 1986-1987 (dactyl.), p.67-73. The abbot of Bernay, Raoul, parent of Humphrey, would have entrusted to him between 1027 and 1040, part of the heritage of his monastery. Like other lords of the beginning of the 11th century, like the family of Bellême, he increased the family's power by recovering or winning of ecclesiastical lands
      ^ Orderic Vitalis, History of Normandy, Éd. Guizot, 1826, vol. III, livre VIII, p. 373. Charpillon et Caresme, Dictionnaire historique des communes de l'Eure, vol I, 1879, art. Beaumont-le-Roger
      [edit] Sources
      (French) Pierre Bauduin, La première Normandie (Xe-XIe siècles), Presses Universitaires de Caen, 2004
      (French) Véronique Gazeau, Monachisme et aristocratie au XIe siècle : l'exemple de la famille de Beaumont, doctoral thesis, Université de Caen, 1986-1987 (dactyl.)
      Seigneurs de Beaumont-le-Roger on Medieval Lands
      [edit] External links
      Onfroi de Pont-Audemer (995-1044) on Familypedia

      Humphrey (or Onfroi or Umfrid) of Vieilles (died c. 1050) was the first holder of the "grand honneur" of Beaumont-le-Roger, one of the most important groups of domains in eastern Normandy and the founder of the House of Beaumont.

      His early life and origins are the subject of much discussion. He was the grandson of Torf (or Turolf), who some historians identify with Turstin le Riche, the father-in-law of Robert the Dane, and by others with an ancestor of the lords of Harcourt. Whichever is the better hypothesis, we can be sure Humphrey descended from a Scandinavian Viking family.

      Besides Beaumont-le-Roger, he had lands dispersed through the whole of Normandy, in Cotentin, in Hiémois, in the Pays d'Auge, in Basse Seine (Vatteville-la-Rue), in Évrecin (Normanville) and in Vexin normand (Bouafles). These lands originated in the favor of the dukes Richard II and Robert II, from confiscated church lands. The "honneur" of Beaumont was, for example, constituted from the remains of the lands of the abbey of Bernay. On the other hand, the possessions around Pont-Audemer came to him by family inheritance.

      In 1034, he 'founded' (or, rather, restored) the monastery at Préaux, a few kilometers from Pont-Audemer, with monks from the Saint-Wandrille.

      During the minority of Duke William the Bastard, Roger I of Tosny, holder of the "honneur" of Conches, attacked Humphrey's domains. But around 1040, Humphrey's son, Roger de Beaumont, met and defeated Roger in battle, during which Roger was killed.