JosephSmithSr.
So shall it be with my father: he shall be
called a prince over his posterity, holding
the keys of the patriarchal priesthood over the kingdom of God on earth, even the Church
of the Latter Day Saints, and he shall sit in the general assembly of patriarchs, even in
council with the Ancient of Days when he shall sit and all the patriarchs with him and shall
enjoy his right and authority under the direction of the Ancient of Days.
First Name:  Last Name: 
Maiden Married
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Donate Now
SMITH,  Joseph Sr.

SMITH, Joseph Sr.[1]

Male 1771 - 1840  (69 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

 Set As Default Person    

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name SMITH, Joseph 
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 12 Jul 1771  Topsfield, Essex, MassachusettsFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 14 Sep 1840  Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United StatesFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 15 Sep 1840  Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United StatesFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I34  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr.
    Last Modified 18 Mar 2017 

    Father SMITH, Asael ,   b. 7 Mar 1744, Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Oct 1830, Stockholm, St. Lawrence, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Mother DUTY, Mary Elizabeth ,   b. 11 Oct 1743, Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1836, Kirtland, Lake, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years) 
    Married 12 Feb 1767  Topsfield, Essex, MassachusettsFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 25 Aug 1897
    Family ID F7774  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family MACK, Lucy   Additional Information on MACK,  Lucy - I35,   b. 8 Jul 1775, Gilsum, Cheshire, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1856, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 24 Jan 1796  Tunbridge, Orange, VermontFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. SMITH   Additional Information on SMITH - I36,   b. 1797, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1797, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     2. SMITH, Alvin   Additional Information on SMITH,  Alvin - I37,   b. 11 Feb 1798, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Nov 1823, Palmyra, Wayne, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
    +3. SMITH, Hyrum ,   b. 9 Feb 1800, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1844, Carthage, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)
    +4. SMITH, Sophronia   Additional Information on SMITH,  Sophronia - I39,   b. 17 May 1803, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Oct 1876, Colchester, McDonough, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
    +5. SMITH, Joseph Jr. ,   b. 23 Dec 1805, Sharon, Windsor, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1844, Carthage, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
    +6. SMITH, Samuel Harrison ,   b. 13 Mar 1808, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
     7. SMITH, Ephriam   Additional Information on SMITH,  Ephriam - I41,   b. 13 Mar 1810, Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Mar 1810, Royalton, Windsor, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +8. SMITH, William B.   Additional Information on SMITH,  William B. - I42,   b. 13 Mar 1811, Royalton, Windsor, Vermont Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Nov 1893, Osterdock, Clayton, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
    +9. SMITH, Katherine   Additional Information on SMITH,  Katherine - I43,   b. 8 Jul 1813, Lebanon, Grafton, New Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1900, Fountain Green, Hancock, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
    +10. SMITH, Don Carlos   Additional Information on SMITH,  Don Carlos - I44,   b. 25 Mar 1816, Norwich, Windsor, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Aug 1841, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
    +11. SMITH, Lucy ,   b. 18 Jul 1821, Manchester, Ontario, New York, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Dec 1882, Colchester, McDonough, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
    Last Modified 9 Nov 2014 16:38:04 
    Family ID F25  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 12 Jul 1771 - Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Jan 1796 - Tunbridge, Orange, Vermont Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 Sep 1840 - Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 15 Sep 1840 - Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    josephsr.jpg
    josephsr.jpg
    Joseph Smith Sr. & Lucy Mack
    Joseph Smith Sr. & Lucy Mack
    Commissioned painting by JSEHS
    Joseph Smith Sr
    Joseph Smith Sr
    Joseph-Sr.jpg
    Joseph-Sr.jpg
    JosephSrLucy1.jpg
    JosephSrLucy1.jpg

  • Notes 
    • Ref: History of the Church - Ancestry of Joseph Smith the Prophet 13, 14, 15, 16) Joseph Smith, son of Asael Smith, and father of the Prophet, was born at Topsfield, Massachusetts, [Insert- Four generations of ancestors of the Prophet Joseph Smith lived in Topsfield, Mass. in the center of the village is this monument, above, in the Topsfield Common. Opposite the common is the Congregational Church of Topsfield, left the third religious edifice to be situated on the same site. Several of the Prophet's ancestors, including his father and grandfather, were baptized and worshipped in one of the earlier structures.]--Kenneth Mays July 12, 1771. He accompanied his father, Asael Smith, first to northern New Hampshire, thence to Tunbridge, Vermont, where he assisted in clearing a farm of which, four years after it was first cleared, he took possession to cultivate on the "half share" system, common to those times in New England; while his father and four other sons went on clearing a farm of which, four years after it was first cleared, he took possession to cultivate on the "half share" system, common to those times in New England; while his father and four other sons went on clearing other lands. Here he married Lucy Mack, daughter of Solomon Mack of Gilsum, Cheshire county, New Hampshire. The young people met during the repeated visits of Lucy to her brother, Stephen Mack, who was engaged in the mercantile and tinning business with John Mudget at Tunbridge. The marriage took place on the 24th of January, 1796. Soon after the marriage as the young people were starting on a visit to the bride's parents, at Gilsum, the matter of making Lucy a wedding present became a subject of conversation. "Well," said Mr. Mudget, "Lucy ought to have something worth naming, and I will give her just as much as you will;" this to Stephen Mack. "Done," said the brother, "I will give her five hundred dollars in cash." "Good," said the other, "and I will give her five hundred dollas more." They drew a check for one thousand dollars upon their bankers, and Lucy had been provided with her dowry.(10) (footnote #10 - History of the Project Joseph, Lucy Smith; Improvement Era, edition, published at Salt Lake City, 1902, with an Introduction by Joseph F. Smith, President of the L.D.S. Church and nephew of the Prophet.) "This check," says Lucy, "I laid aside, as I had other mens by me sufficient to purchase my house-keeping furniture" (11) (footnote #11 History of the Prophet Joseph. Lucy x. As it will be necessary to make frequent reference to this book, it is proper to say that it was originally published under the title Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet and his Progenitors for Many Generations, by Lucy Smith, mother of the Prophet. --------------------------------------- Seek Ye Earnestly - Background of the Prophet Joseph Smith pg. 177 Joseph Smith, Senior, was the first to accept the message of the Prophet. His life was from that time forth, interwoven in the history of the Church. He was the first Patriarch ordained in this dispensation, receiving that office by divine right as the firstborn descendants of Ephraim. All of these persons were highly respected and honored by their fellow citizens, until the knowledge went forth that the Lord had spoken to the youthful Prophet. From that day forth vicious and evil persons did everything in their power to destroy the character of Joseph Smith and his forebears, thus fulfilling the prophetic words of Moroni when he first came to the bedside of Joseph Smith with the definite call to his important mission. ----------------------------------------- The History of Joseph Smith by His Mother From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The History of Joseph Smith by His Mother is a biography of the Latter Day Saint prophet Joseph Smith, according to his mother, Lucy Mack Smith. It was originally titled "Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith, the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations" and was published by Orson Pratt in Liverpool in 1853. Contents /Background Shortly following the death of Joseph Smith in 1844, and into 1845, Lucy Mack Smith dictated her recollections and family story to Nauvoo school-teacher Martha Jane Coray. Coray worked with her husband to compile these books of notes and other sources into a manuscript, which was then copied. One copy was given to Brigham Young, and the other stayed with Lucy Smith in Nauvoo. Eventually, LDS Apostle Orson Pratt obtained Lucy's copy and published it in 1853, to great controversy.[1] Brigham Young's opposition After its publication, Brigham Young declared the book to be a "tissue of lies" and wanted corrections made.[2] In the Millennial Star in 1855, he said, There are many mistakes in the work… I have had a written copy of those sketches in my possession for several years, and it contains much of the history of the Prophet Joseph. Should it ever be deemed best to publish these sketches, it will not be done until after they are carefully corrected.[3] In 1865, Young ordered the church members to have their copies destroyed. There was no "corrected" version until the church published a 1901 serialization and 1902 book, which were done under the direction of Joseph F. Smith, Lucy's grandson.[1] Later historians theorized that Young opposed the book because of his own conflicts with its publisher, Orson Pratt,[4] as well as the book's favorable references to William Smith, Young's opponent and Lucy's son.[2] Lucy Smith portrayed the Smith family as the legitimate leaders of Mormonism, which Young may also have seen as a challenge to his leadership of the church. [5] Importance Noted LDS historian Leonard Arrington saw the book as "informative, basically accurate, and extremely revealing of Joseph Smith's early life and family background," and felt it "perhaps tells more about Mormon origins than any other single source.[4] Richard L. Anderson called it one of "the essential sources for Mormon origins."[5] Non-Mormon historian Jan Shipps identifies this history as being "of central importance in the Mormon historical corpus."[6] Editions The book has been republished several times, under various publishers, editors and titles. The following is a list of editions with significant changes to the text or title. Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet, and His Progenitors for Many Generations, by Lucy Smith, Mother of the Prophet. Liverpool: S.W. Richards for Orson Pratt. 1853. . Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet and His Progenitors for Many Generations. Plano, Illinois: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 1880. Smith, George A.; Smith, Elias, eds. (1902), History of the Prophet Joseph, by His Mother, Lucy Smith, as Revised by George A. Smith and Elias Smith, Salt Lake City, Utah: Improvement Era, . Nibley, Preston, ed (1945). History of Joseph Smith, By His Mother, Lucy Mack Smith. Salt Lake City, Utah: Stevens & Wallis. Later editions from Nibley were through Bookcraft. Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith, the Prophet. New York: Arno Press. 1969. Tanner, Jerald and Sandra (1978). Joseph Smith's History By His Mother: The Book Brigham Young Tried to Destroy. Salt Lake City, Utah: Modern Microfilm Co.. Proctor, Scot Facer; Proctor, Maurine Jensen, eds. (1996), The Revised and Enhanced History of Joseph Smith By His Mother, Salt Lake City, Utah: Bookcraft, ISBN 1570082677. Anderson, Lavina Fielding, ed (2001). Lucy's Book: A Critical Edition of Lucy Mack Smith's Family Memoir. Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books. ISBN 1-56085-137-6. Ingleton, R. Vernon, ed (2005). History of Joseph Smith by His Mother, Lucy Mack Smith; the Unabridged Original Version. Provo, Utah: Stratford Books. ISBN 0-929753-05-4. Notes Anderson, Lavina Fielding (2001). "The Textual History of Lucy's Book". Lucy's Book. Salt Lake City, Utah: Signature Books. Retrieved on 2009-02-23. (Shipps 1987, p. 91) "Preface". Joseph Smith, The Prophet And His Progenitors For Many Generations. Retrieved on 2008-07-03. (Shipps 1987, p. 100) (Shipps 1987, p. 105) (Shipps 1987, p. 92) References Shipps, Jan (1987). Mormonism: The Story of a New Religious Tradition. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-01417-0. The story of Joseph Smith By Lucy Mack Smith - Chapter 11 My (Lucy Mack Smith) husband (Joseph Smith, Sr. #47557), as before stated, followed merchandising for a short period in the town of Randolph. Soon after he commenced business in this place he ascertained that crystallized ginseng root sold very high in China, being used as a remedy for the plague which was then raging there. He therefore concluded to embark in a traffic of this article, and consequently made an investment of all the means which he commanded, in that way and manner which was necessary to carry on a business of this kind, viz., crystalizing and exporting the root. When he had obtained a quantity of the same, a merchant by the name of Stevens, of Royalton, offered him three thousand dollars for what he had, but my husband refused his offer as it was only about two-thirds of its real value, and told the gentleman that he would rather venture shipping it himself. My husband in a short time went to the City of New York with the view of shipping his ginseng and, finding a vessel in port which was soon to set sail, he made arrangements with the captain to this effect--that he was to sell the ginseng in China and return the avails thereof to my husband; and this the captain bound himself to do in a written obligation. Mr. Stevens, hearing that Mr. Smith was making arrangements to ship his ginseng, repaired immediately to New York and by taking some pains he ascertained the vessel on board of which Mr. Smith had shipped his ginseng and, having some of the same article on hand himself, he made arrangements with the captain to take his also and he was to send his son on board the vessel to take charge of it. It appears from circumstances that afterwards transpired that the ginseng was taken to china and sold there to good advantage or at a high price, but not to much advantage to us for we never received anything except a small chest of tea, of the avails arising from this adventure. When the vessel returned, Stevens, the younger, also returned with it, and when my husband became apprized of his arrival he went immediately to him and made inquiry respecting the success of the success of the captain in selling his ginseng. Mr. Stevens told him quite a plausible tale, the particulars of which had been brought for Mr. Smith from China was a small chest of tea, which chest had been delivered into his care for my husband. In a short time after this young Stevens hired a house of major Mack and employed eight or ten hands and commenced the business of crystallizing ginseng. Soon after engaging in this business, when he had got fairly at work, my brother, Major Mack, went to see him and, as it happened, he found him considerably intoxicated. When my brother came into his presence he spoke to him thus, "Well, Mr Stevens you are doing a fine business; you will soon be ready for another trip to China." Then observed again, in a quite indifferent manner, "Oh, Mr. Stevens, how much did Brother Smith's adventure bring!" Being under the influence of liquor, he was not on his guard and took my brother by the hand and led him to a trunk; then opening it, he observed, "There, sir, are the proceeds of Mr Smith's ginseng!" exhibiting a large amount of silver and gold. My brother was much astounded at this; however, he disguised his feelings and conversed with him a short time upon different subjects, then returned home, and about ten o'clock the same night he started for Randolph to see my husband. When Mr. Stevens had overcome his intoxication he began to reflect upon what he had done and, making some inquiry concerning my brother, he ascertained that he had gone to Randolph. Mr. Stevens, conjecturing his business--that he had gone to see my husband respecting the ginseng adventure--went immediately to his establishment, dismissed his hands, called his carriage, and fled with his cash for Canada, and I have never heard anything concerning him since. My husband pursued him a while, but finding pursuit vain, returned home much dispirited at the state of his affairs. He then went to work to overhaul his accounts in order to see how he stood with the world, upon which China adventure, he had lost about two thousand dollars in bad debts. At the tie he sent his venture to China he was owing eighteen hundred dollars in the city of Boston for store good, and he expected to discharge the debt at the return of the China expedition; but, having invested almost all his means in ginseng, the loss which he suffered in this article rendered it impossible for him to pay his debt with the property which remained in his hands. The principal dependence left him, in the shape of property, was the farm at Tunbridge, upon which we were then living, having moved back to this place immediately after his venture was sent to China. This farm, which was worth about fifteen hundred dollars, my husband sold for eight hundred dollars, which my brother and Mr. Mudget gave me, I added it to the eight hundred dollars obtained for the farm, and by this means the debt was liquidated. ---------------------------- Joseph Smith, Sr. at age 12 was involved in the Revolutionary War- 1783. ----------------------------- The Life of Joseph Smith by His Mother, Lucy Smith Chapter 13 - pg 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 - After selling the farm at Tunbridge, we moved only a short distance to the town of Royalton. Here we resided a few months, then moved again to Sharon, Windsor County, Vermont. In the latter place my husband (Joseph Smith Sr.#47557) rented a farm of my father (Solomon Smith #46869) which he cultivated in the summer teaching school in the winter. In this way my husband continued laboring for a few years, during which time our circumstances gradually improved until we found ourselves quite comfortable again. In the meantime we had a son whom we called Joseph after the name of his father; he was born December 23, 1805. I shall speak of him more particularly by and by. We moved then thence to Tunbridge. Here we had another son whom we named Samuel Harrison, born March 13, 1808. We lived in this place a short time, then moved to Royalton, where Ephraim was born, March 13, 1810. We continued here until we had another son, born March 13, 1811, whom we called William. About this time my husband's mind (Joseph Smith, Sr. herein #47557) became much excited upon the subject of religion; yet he would not subscribe to any particular system of faith, but contended for the ancient order, as established by our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and His Apostles. One night my husband retired to his bed in a very thoughtful state of mind, contemplating the situation of the Christian religion, or the confusion and discord that were extent. He soon fell into a sleep, and before waking had the following vision, which I shall relate in his own words, just as he told it to me the next morning: "I seemed to be traveling in an open, barren field, and as I was traveling, I turned my eyes towards the east, the west, the north and the south, but could see nothing save dead, fallen timber. Not a vestige of life, either animal or vegetable, could be seen; besides, to render the scene still more dreary, the most death-like silence prevailed, no sound of anything animate could be heard in all the exception of an attendant spirit, who kept meaning of what I saw, and why I was thus traveling in such a dismal place. He answered thus: "This field is the world, which now lieth inanimate and dumb, in regard to the true religion, or plan of salvation; but travel on, and by the wayside you will find on a certain log a box, the contents of which, if you eat thereof, will make you wise, and give unto you wisdom and understanding.' I carefully observed what was told me by my guide, and proceeding a short distance, I came to the box. I immediately took it up, and placed it under my left arm; then with eagerness I raised the lid, and began to taste of its contents; upon which all manner of beasts, horned cattle, and roaring animals, rose up on every side in the most threatening manner possible, tearing the earth, tossing their horns, and bellowing most terrifically all around me, and they finally came so close upon me, that I was compelled to drop the box and fly for my life. Yet, in the midst of all this I was perfectly happy, though I awoke trembling." From this forward, my husband seemed more confirmed than ever in the opinion that there was no order or class of religionists that knew any more concerning the Kingdom of God than those of the world, or such as made no profession of religion whatever. In 1811, we moved from Royalton, Vermont, to the town of Lebanon, New Hampshire. Soon after arriving here, my husband received another very singular vision, which I will relate: "I thought," said he, "I was traveling in an open, desolate field, which appeared to be very barren. As I was thus traveling, the thought suddenly came into my mind that I had better stop and reflect upon what I was doing, before I went any farther. So I asked myself, 'What motive can I have in traveling here, and what place can this be?' My guide, who was by my side, as before, said, "This is the desolate world; but travel on.' The road was so broad and barren that I wondered why I should travel in it; for, said I to myself, Broad is the road, and wide is the gate that leads to death, and many there be that walk therein; but narrow is the way, and strait is the gate that leads thereat.' Traveling a short distance further, I came to a narrow path. This path I entered, and, when I had traveled a little way in it. I beheld a beautiful stream of water, which ran most the east to the west. Of this stream, I could see neither the source nor yet the mouth; but as far as my eyes could extend I could see a rope, running along the bank of it, about as high as a man could reach, and beyond me was a low, but very pleasant valley, in which stood a tree such as I had never seen before. It was exceedingly handsome, insomuch that I looked upon it with wonder and admiration. Its beautiful branches spread themselves somewhat like an umbrella, and it bore a kind of fruit, in shape much like a chestnut bur, and as white as snow, or, if possible, whiter. I gazed upon the same with considerable interest, and as I was doing so, the burs or shells commenced opening and shedding their particles, or the fruit which they contained, which was of dazzling whiteness. I drew near, 'I cannot eat this alone, I must bring my wife and children, that they may partake with me.' Accordingly, I went and brought my family which consisted of a wife and seven children, and we all commenced eating and praising God for this blessing. We were exceedingly happy, insomuch that our joy could not easily be expressed. While thus engaged, I beheld a spacious building standing opposite the valley which we were in, and it appeared to reach to the very heavens. It was full of people, who were very finely dressed. When these people observed us in the low valley, under the tree, they pointed the finger of scorn at us, and treated us with all manner of disrespect and contempt. But their contumely we utterly disregarded. I presently turned to my guide and inquired of him the meaning of the fruit that was so delicious. He told me it was the pure love of God, shed abroad in the hearts of all those who love him, and keep his commandments He then commanded me go and bring the rest of my children I told him that we were all there. 'No,' he replied, 'look yonder, you have two more, and you must bring them also.' Upon raising my eyes, I saw two small children, standing some distance off. I immediately went to them, and brought them to the tree; upon which they commenced eating with the rest, and we all rejoiced together. The more we ate, the more we seemed to desire, until we even got down upon our knees and scooped it up, eating it by double handfuls. After feasting in this manner a short time, I asked my guide what was the meaning of the spacious building which I saw. He replied, 'It is Babylon, it is Babylon and it must fall. The people in the doors and windows are the inhabitants thereof, who scorn and despise the Saints of God because of their humility.' I soon awoke, clapping my hands together for joy." .... ........... I shall now deviate a little from my subject, in order to relate another very singular dream which my husband (RIN 47557 herein) had about this time, which is as follows: "I dreamed," said he, "that I was traveling on foot, and I was very, and so lame I could hardly walk. My guide, as usual, attended me. Traveling some time together, I became so lame that I thought I could go no farther. I informed my guide of this and asked him what I should do. He told me to travel on till I came to a certain garden. So I arose and started for this garden. While on my way thither, I asked my guide how I should know the place. He said, 'Proceed until you come to a very large gate; open this and you will see a garden, blooming with the most beautiful flowers that your eyes ever beheld, and there you shall be healed.' By limping along with great difficulty, I finally reached the gate; and on entering it, I saw the before-mentioned garden, which was beautiful beyond description, being filled with the most delicate flowers of every kind and color. In the garden were walks about three and a half feet wide, which were set on both sides with marble stones. One of the walks ran from the gate through the centre of the garden; and on each side of this was a very richly carved seat, and on each seat were placed six wooden images, each of which was the size of a very large man. When I came to the first image on the right side, it arose and bowed to me with much deference. I then turned to the one which sat opposite me, on the left side, and it arose and bowed to me in the same manner as the first. I continued turning, first to the right and then to the left, until the whole twelve had made their obeisance, after which I was entirely healed. I then asked my guide the meaning of all this, but I awoke before I received an answer." I will now return to the subject of the farm. When the time for making the second payment drew nigh, Alvin went from home to get work, in order to raise the money, and after much hardship and fatigue, returned with the required amount. This payment being made, we felt relieved, as this was the only thing that troubled us; for we had a snug log- house, neatly furnished, and the means of living comfortably. It was now only two years since we entered Palmyra, almost destitute of money property, or acquaintance. The hand of friendship was extended on every side, and we blessed God, with our whole heart, for his "mercy, which endureth for ever." And not only temporal blessings were bestowed upon us, but also spiritual were administered. The scripture, which saith, "Your old men shall dream dreams," was fulfilled in the case of my husband, for, about this time, he had another vision, which I shall here relate; this, with one more, is all of his that I shall obtrude upon the attention of my readers. He received two more visions, which would probably be somewhat interesting, but I cannot remember them distinctly enough to rehearse them in full. The following, which was the sixth, ran thus: "I thought I was walking alone; I was much fatigued, nevertheless I continued traveling. It seemed to me that I was going to meeting, that it was the day of judgment, and that I was going to be judged. "When I came in sight of the meeting-house, I saw multitudes of people coming from every direction, and pressing with great anxiety towards the door of this great building; but I thought I should get there in time, hence there was no need of being in a hurry. But, on arriving at the door, I found it shut; I knocked for admission and was informed by the porter that I had come too late. I felt exceedingly troubled and prayed earnestly for admittance. Presently I found that my flesh was perishing. I continued to pray, still my flesh withered upon my bones. I was in a state of almost total despair, when the porter asked me if I had done all that was necessary in order to receive admission. I replied that I had done all that was in my power to do. "Then,' observed the porter, 'justice must be satisfied; after this, mercy hath her claims.' "It then occurred to me to call upon God, in the name of his Son Jesus; and I cried out, satisfied agony of my soul, 'Oh, Lord God, I beseech thee, in the name of Jesus Christ, to forgive my sins.' After which I felt considerably strengthened and I began to mend. The porter or angel then remarked that it was necessary to plead the merits of Jesus, for he was the advocate with the Father, and a Mediator between God and man. "I was now made quite whole and the door was opened, but on entering, I awoke." The following spring, we commenced making preparation for building another house, one that would be more comfortable for persons in advanced life. ----------------------- History of the Mack Family pg. 651 Joseph Smith Sr. He was the First Presiding Patriarch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Joseph Smith, Sr., the husband of Lucy Mack, owned a handsome farm in Tunbridge, which he rented in 1802, and engaged in the mercantile business. By the dishonesty of a trusted agent he became involved in debt and was obliged to sell his farm to cler himself. In 1816 he moved to Palmyra, Wayne Co., New York, and later to Manchester in the same state, where he again tilled the soil. He was a man six feet two inches high, very straight and well proportioned; in his young days he was strong and active and was famed as a wrestler. He was hospitable and benevolent, his home being always open for the entertainment of the stranger. When his son, Joseph Smith, Jr., organized the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, he was ordained as Patriarch. -------------------------- The Revised and Enhanced History of Joseph Smith by His Mother Chapter 47 - Edited by Scot Facer Proctor and Maurine Jensen Proctor Editors' Reminder: The Revised and Enhanced History of Joseph Smith by His Mother is a copyrighted work and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. None of this edited work is in public domain and cannot be published or republished in any form. Chapter 47 Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith with twenty-two family members are driven from Ohio and take the nearly one-thousand-mile journey to Far West, Missouri. An account of their terrible suffering and trials along the way. Lucy catches a cold that persists and threatens her life. Catharine Smith Salisbury gives birth to a son on the journey. Mother Smith hobbles into the woods at Huntsville, Missouri, prays for three hours, and is completely healed. Lucy recounts the mob action at the election in Gallatin, Missouri. Eight mobsters enter the Smith home in Far West to murder Joseph the Prophet. Lucy withstands them and Joseph softens their hearts. The Missouri militia surround the city of Far West to lay it to ashes. May 1838 to October 1838 When we were ready to set out for Missouri, I went to New Portage [1] with a conveyance to bring my husband to the rest of his family, and we were shortly on our way together, right glad to meet again, alive and in good health, after so many perilous adventures. Almost as soon as we were well on our way, my sons began to have calls to preach, and they soon found that if they would yield to every solicitation, our journey would have been a preaching mission of very great length, which was quite inconsistent with the number and situation of our family. [2] They were obliged to notify the people where we stopped that they could not preach to them at all, as if they did, we would not have means sufficient to take us through. They, however, sowed the seeds of the gospel in many places and were the means in the hands of God of doing much good. We traveled on through many trials and difficulties. Sometimes we lay in our tents through a driving storm. At other times we traveled on foot through marshes and quagmires, exposing ourselves to wet and cold. Once we lay all night in the rain, which descended in torrents, and I, being more exposed than the other females, suffered much with the cold, and upon getting up in the morning, I found that a quilted skirt which I had worn the day before was wringing wet, but I could not mend the matter by changing that for another, for the rain was still falling. I wore it in this situation for three days. In consequence of this, I took a severe cold and was very sick, so that when we arrived at the Mississippi I was unable to sit up at any length and could not walk without assistance. After we crossed this river, we stopped at a Negro hut, a most unlovely place, but we could go no farther. Here my daughter Catharine gave birth to a fine son named Alvin. [3] The next morning we set out to find a more comfortable situation for her and succeeded in getting a place about four miles ahead, and my poor child was carried from the loathsome hut to this house in a double wagon. The same day it was agreed that my oldest daughter, Sophronia, and her husband, McLeary, should stay with Catharine, and that Mr. Smith and the remainder of the party would take me with what speed they could to Huntsville. [4] I was no longer able to ride in a sitting posture, but lay on a bedstead carefully covered, as the fresh air kept me coughing continually. My husband did not much expect me to live to the end of the journey, for I could not travel sometimes more than four miles a day. But as soon as we arrived at Huntsville, he sought a place where we might stop for some time, so that all that nursing could do for me could be done. Going as far as Huntsville was my own request, but they did not know why I urged the matter. The fact was, I had an impression that if I could get there and be able to find a place where I could be secluded and uninterrupted in calling upon the Lord, I might be healed. Accordingly, I seized upon a time when they were engaged, and by the aid of staffs I reached a fence, and then followed the fence some distance till I came to a dense hazel thicket. Here I threw myself on the ground and thought it was no matter how far I was from the house, for if the Lord would not hear me and I must die, I might as well die here as anywhere. When I was a little rested, I commenced calling upon the Lord to beseech his mercy, praying for my health and the life of my daughter Catharine. I urged every claim which the scriptures give us and was as humble as I knew how to be, and I continued praying near three hours. At last I was entirely relieved from pain, my cough left me, and I was well. Moreover, I received an assurance that I should hear from my sick daughter about the middle of the same day. I arose and went to the house in as good health as I ever enjoyed. At one o'clock, Wilkins J. Salisbury [5] came to Huntsville and said that Catharine was better and thought if she had a carriage to ride in, she could proceed on her journey. The next morning Salisbury returned to his wife, who was forty miles from Huntsville. The first day she rode thirty miles, and the day after ten miles, which brought her to Huntsville. When she got there, we were holding a meeting and did not expect her, as the rain had been pouring down in torrents all the forenoon. Although they had driven with great speed through the rain, she was cold, and her bed was very wet. As soon as she was put into a dry bed, she had a dreadful ague fit, and we called the elders to lay hands upon her. This helped her, but she continued weak and inclined to chills and fever for a long time. The day after she came, I washed a very large quantity of clothes with as much ease as though I had not been out of health at all. When the company was all gathered together, we started on our journey again and arrived at Far West without any further difficulty. [6] Here we met Joseph [7] and Hyrum in good health. They had heard by William and Carlos, who went into Far West before us, of my sickness and were surprised to see me in such good health as well. We moved into a small log house, having but one room, a very inconvenient place for so large a family. When Joseph saw how we were situated, he proposed that we should take a large tavern house, which he had recently purchased from Brother Gilbert, and we did so. Samuel, previous to this, had moved to a place called Marrowbone, Daviess County. William had moved thirty miles in another direction. We were all now quite comfortable. Nothing of importance occurred from this time until the first of August [8] when an election took place at Gallatin, the county seat of Daviess County. At this election the Mormon brethren went to the polls as usual for the purpose of voting, but a party of men were collected there who were determined to prevent them from exercising their franchise and forbid them from putting in a vote. [9] Without paying any attention to them, one of the brethren, named John Butler, [10] stepped up to the polls and voted, whereupon a man belonging to the adverse party struck him a severe blow. John Butler was a very high-spirited man and could not brook such treatment; consequently, the blow was returned with a force that brought his antagonist to the ground. Four others of the same party came to the assistance of the fallen man and shared his fate, for Mr. Butler was a man of extraordinary strength and, when excited, was not easily overcome. When the mob party saw the discomfiture of their champions, they were much enraged, and that night procured the assistance of the judge of the election, who wrote a number of letters in their behalf. These letters, which were sent in every direction to all the adjoining counties, stated that Joseph Smith had killed seven men at that place, and that the inhabitants had every reason to expect that he would collect his people together and exterminate all who did not belong to his church. They therefore begged the assistance of their neighbors against the Mormons. These letters were extensively circulated and as widely believed. We, who were living at Far West, heard nothing of this until a few days after when Joseph was at our house writing a letter. I was standing at the door of the room where he was sitting, and upon casting my eyes toward the prairie, I saw a large company of armed men advancing toward the city, but, supposing it to be a training day, I said nothing about it to anyone. I soon observed that the main body of men came to a halt. The officers dismounted and eight of them came up to the house. Thinking that they wanted refreshment or something of that sort, I set chairs. But instead, they entered and placed themselves in a menacing line like a rank of soldiers across the room. When I requested them to sit down they replied, "We do not choose to sit. We have come here to kill Joe Smith and all the Mormons." "Oh," said I, "what has Joseph Smith done that you should want to kill him?" "He has killed seven men in Daviess County," replied the foremost, "and we have come to kill him, and all his church." "He has not been in Daviess County," I answered, "consequently the report must be false. Furthermore, if you should see him, you would not want to kill him." "There is no doubt that the report is perfectly correct," rejoined the officer; "it came straight to us, and I believe it; and we were sent to kill the Prophet and all who believe him, and I'll be d--d if I don't execute my orders." "Then you are going to kill me with the rest, I suppose," said I. "Yes, we will," he replied. "Very well," I answered, "but I want you to act like a gentleman about it and do the job quick. Just shoot me down at once, for then it will be but a moment till I shall be perfectly happy. But I would hate to be murdered by any slow process, and I do not see the need of it either, for you can just as well dispatch the work at once as for it to be ever so long a time." "There it is again," said he. "That is always their plea. You tell a Mormon that you'll shoot him, and all the good it does is to hear them answer, 'Well, that's nothing. If you kill me, we shall be happy.' D--, seems that's all the satisfaction you can get from them anyway." Joseph had continued writing till now, but having finished his letter, he asked me for a wafer to seal it. Seeing that he was at liberty, I said, "Gentlemen, suffer me to make you acquainted with Joseph Smith the Prophet." He looked upon them with a very pleasant smile and, stepping up to them, gave each of them his hand in a manner which convinced them that he was neither a guilty criminal nor yet a cowering hypocrite. They stopped and stared as though a spectre had crossed their path. Joseph sat down and entered into conversation with them and explained the views and feelings of the people called "Mormons," what their course had been, and the treatment which they had received from their enemies since the first. He told them that malice and detraction had pursued them ever since they entered Missouri, but they were a people who had never broken the laws to his knowledge. They stood ready to be tried by the law - and if anything contrary to the law had been done by any of the brethren at Daviess, it would certainly be just to call them to an account, before molesting or murdering others that knew nothing of these transactions at Gallatin. After this he rose and said, "Mother, I believe I will go home. Emma will be expecting me." At this, two of the men sprang to their feet, saying, "You shall not go alone, for it is not safe. We will go with you and guard you." Joseph thanked them and they left with him. While they were absent, the remainder of the officers stood by the door, and I overheard the following conversation between them: First Officer: "Did you not feel something strange when Smith took you by the hand? I never felt so in my life." Second Officer: "I felt as though I could not move. I would not harm one hair of that man's head for the whole world." Third Officer: "This is the last time you will ever catch me coming to kill Joe Smith or the Mormons either." First Officer: "I guess this is my last expedition against this place. I never saw a more harmless, innocent-appearing man than the Mormon Prophet." Second Officer: "That story about his killing them men is all a d--d lie. There is no doubt of that, and we have had all this trouble for nothing. It's the last time I'll be fooled in this way." Those men who went home with my son promised to disband the militia under them and go home. They said that if Joseph had any use for them, they would come back and follow him anywhere. Thus, we considered that hostilities were no longer to be feared from the citizens. Joseph and Hyrum thought it proper, however, to go to Daviess County and ascertain the cause of the difficulty. They did so, and after receiving the strongest assurance of the future good attentions of the civil officers to administer equal rights and privileges among all the citizens, Mormons and anti-Mormons alike, they returned, hoping all would be well. Soon after this we heard that William and his wife, Caroline, [11] who lived twenty miles distant, were very sick. Samuel was at Far West at the time and set out immediately for William's house with a carriage in order to bring them to our house. In a few days they arrived, feeling very low, and seemed more likely to die of the disease than to recover from it when they got there. But with close attention and great care, they soon began to show signs of recovery. During the time when I was taking care of my son William and his wife, many things transpired that would probably be of interest to my readers, which I know nothing about, as I was so engaged with the care of my house and the sickness of my family, that I did not know, nor yet inquire or hear, what was going on. [12] In a little while after Samuel brought William and Caroline to our house, there was born unto Samuel a son, whom he called by his own name. [13] When he was but three days old, [14] his father was compelled to leave home. Samuel's family was, at this time, living in a desolate, lonely place about thirty miles from Far West then called Marrowbone, afterwards named Shady Grove. Samuel had not been gone long when a number of the men who lived near him went to his wife and told her that the mob was coming there to drive all the Mormons from the country into Far West and perhaps they would kill them. They accordingly advised her to go immediately to Far West at all hazards and proffered to find her a wagon and boy to drive the horses. She consented, and they brought an open lumber wagon and put her into it on a bed with a very little clothing for herself and her children. In this way, she started for Far West with no one but a small boy to take care of her, the children and the team, and nothing to eat by the way. When they had traveled for some miles they stopped for the night, and in the latter part of the night it began to rain. The water fell upon her in torrents, for she had no shelter for herself or her infant. The bedding was soon completely saturated as the rain continued falling for some time with great violence. The next day Samuel started from Far West to go to his own house, but met his wife along the way in this situation. He returned with her to Far West, where she arrived about thirty-six hours after she had left Marrowbone without having taken any nourishment. Every garment upon her body, as well as her bed and bedding, was so wet with the rain that the water might have been wrung from them. She was speechless and almost stiff with the cold and effects of her exposure. We laid her on a bed, and my husband and my sons administered to her by the laying on of hands. We then changed her clothing, put her into a bed covered with warm blankets, and after pouring a little rice water into her mouth, she was administered to again. This time she raised her eyes and seemed to revive a little. I continued to employ every means that lay in my power for her benefit and that of my other sick children. In this I was much assisted by Emma and my daughters. We soon reaped the reward of our labor, for in a short time they began to mend, and I now congratulated myself on the pleasure I should feel in seeing my children all well and enjoying each other's society again. After William began to sit up a little, he told me that he had a vision during his sickness, in which he saw a tremendous army of men coming into Far West, and that it was his impression that the time would not be long before he should see it fulfilled. I was soon convinced by the circumstances which afterwards transpired that he was not mistaken in his opinion. [15] I felt concerned about this, for I feared that some evil was hanging over us, but I knew nothing of the operations of the mob party, until one day Joseph rode up and told me to be not at all frightened, but the mob was coming, and we must all keep perfectly quiet. He wished the sisters to stay indoors and not suffer themselves to be seen in the streets. He could not stay with us, for he wanted to see the brethren and have them keep their families quiet and at home. He rode off, but I soon learned who the mob were. This was the state mob [16] that was sent by the governor, [17] a company of ten thousand men [18] that stationed themselves on Salt Creek. My son-in-law Mr. McLeary went out with some others to meet the mob and ascertain what their business was. They gave the messengers to understand that they would soon commence an indiscriminate butchery of men, women, and children, that their orders were to convert Far West into a human slaughter pen and never quit it while there was a lisping babe or a decrepit old woman breathing within its bounds. There were, however, three persons that they wished brought forth before they began their operations. They desired to preserve their lives, as some of them were related to one of the mob officers. These were Adam Lightner, John Cleminson and his wife, but after a short interview, John Cleminson, who was not a member of the Church, replied that they had lived with the Mormons and knew them to be an innocent people, "and if," said he, "you are determined to destroy them, and lay the city in ashes, you must destroy me also, for I will die with them." Notes: 1 New Portage, Ohio, was about fifty miles southwest of Kirtland. 2 It is noteworthy and poignant to look carefully at those of the Smith family in this party now being driven from their homes in Ohio. They numbered about twenty-four, and included Joseph Smith Sr., sixty-six years old, Lucy Mack Smith, sixty-two, and ten other adults: Sophronia and husband William McLeary; Samuel Harrison and wife Mary; William and wife Caroline; Catharine and husband Wilkins J. Salisbury; and Don Carlos and wife Agnes. Sixteen-year-old Lucy was along, as well as eleven children eight years old and under: Eunice Stoddard, eight; Maria Stoddard, six; Elizabeth Salisbury, six; Lucy Salisbury, three; Mary Jane Smith, three; Solomon Salisbury, two; Susanna Smith, two; Agnes Smith, twenty-two months; Caroline Smith, twenty-two months; Mary Smith, one; and Sophronia Smith, a few days or weeks old. One more baby, Alvin Salisbury, would be born on the banks of the Mississippi River, June 7, 1838. Mary, Samuel's wife, was seven months pregnant. Agnes, Don Carlos's wife, gave birth in New Portage on the trip; and Catharine was nine months pregnant and gave birth at the Mississippi. Joseph's and Hyrum's families had already moved to Missouri some weeks or months earlier. It must be noted that Sophronia's first husband, Calvin Stoddard, passed away in Kirtland, May 19, 1836. In the Preliminary Manuscript, Lucy incorrectly stated that in the hut Catharine gave birth to a daughter. Alvin was born, as stated, Friday, June 7, 1838. Huntsville, Missouri, was about eighty miles west of the crossing of the Mississippi River. This was Catharine's husband. The journey from Kirtland, Ohio, to Far West, Missouri, was approximately one thousand miles. 7 Joseph and his family arrived in Far West on March 14, 1838. 8 This was the first week of August. The election was held on Monday, August 6, 1838. 9 It is recorded in the History of the Church that Colonel William P. Peniston, who had led the mob in Clay County, gave an inflammatory speech on the occasion of this election to those gathered at the polls "for the purpose of exciting them against the 'Mormons,' saying, 'The Mormon leaders are a set of horse thieves, liars, counterfeiters, and you know they profess to heal the sick, and cast out devils, and you all know that is a lie.' He further said that the members of the Church were dupes, and not too good to take a false oath on any common occasion; that they would steal, and he did not consider property safe where they were; that he was opposed to their settling in Daviess county; and if they suffered the 'Mormons' to vote, the people would soon lose their suffrage; 'and,' said he, addressing the Saints, 'I headed a mob to drive you out of Clay county, and would not prevent your being mobbed now.'" (History of the Church 3:57.) 10 The name of John Butler was edited out by George A. Smith (see George A. Smith, Edited 1853, p. 221). George A. had desired a "note" to be arranged here explaining the change, but no note was added in the 1902 or later versions. 11 William Smith married Caroline Amanda (or Amelia) Grant on February 14, 1833, in Kirtland. Together they had two daughters, Mary Jane (January 1835) and Caroline (August 1836). William's wife, Caroline, died in Nauvoo, May 22, 1845. 12 This statement, left out of all previous editions, gives us an interesting insight into Lucy's everyday life. Even for one like Lucy, who was at the very center of the events of the Restoration, life's everyday cares sometimes swallowed up her attention to the point that she was oblivious to some of the dramatic events that led to the Missouri expulsion. 13 Samuel Harrison Bailey Smith was born on Wednesday, August 1, 1838, at Shady Grove, Polk County, Missouri. 14 In the 1853 and later editions, "three days" is changed to "three weeks." This would change Samuel's departure from August 4, 1838, to sometime around August 22, 1838. 15 This account describing William's vision was included in the 1853 edition, but cut from all subsequent editions. 16 Lucy refers to this group as "the state mob." It was the Missouri state militia. 17 Governor Lilburn W. Boggs. 18 Lucy's estimate is high. It is more likely that the militia consisted of up to three thousand men. 1999-2009 Meridian Magazine . All Rights Reserved. About the Authors: Maurine Jensen Proctor is the Editor-in-Chief of Meridian Magazine and the author with her husband Scot of several books. Scot is the Publisher of Meridian Magazine. Related Resources: History of Joseph Smith Archive -------------------------------------------- A Spiritual Experience In 1803 Lucy also had her well-known seeker dream in which she first saw Joseph Sr.'s spiritual flexibility as a tree bending gracefully in the wind, preparing to receive the gospel of the Son of God as compared with Joseph's brother Jesse's resistance as a pillar of marble. [17] Lucy was clearly conflicted by this family situation. However, to begin to understand this dream it is necessary to review the context of the development of the religious discourse in the upper Connecticut and White River Valleys. In 1769 Eleazar Wheelook founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, to teach the Native Americans, prepare missionaries, and train ministers for the rapidly growing towns in the region [18] -- including Elijah Lyman [19] and Solomon Aikens, [20] uncles of Joseph Sr.'s later sisters-in-law, Clarissa Lyman and Mary Aikens. Spiritual Background of the Community Eleazar Wheelock was a Yale graduate and a product of the Great Awakening; he was mentored by Jonathan Edwards, a traditional Puritan Calvinist, and George Whitefield, a Methodist Arminian closely associated with John and Charles Wesley. [21] Wheelock leaned in the direction of the Arminian concept of free agency rather than the Calvinist concept of predestination. [22] He selectively used Edwards's work on the Freedom of the Will, which discussed both approaches, as his principal religious text. [23] Dartmouth trained hundreds of ministers in the region by the early 1800s. [24] Traditional Calvinism, however, gained increasing strength in the region by 1810 and vehemently opposed both Universalism, which applied Christ's Atonement broadly to everyone, and Arminianism, which applied the Atonement's highest degree of glory all those who would consecrate their lives to the service of Christ. Calvinism's __________ 15 Ibid., 274. 16 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83. 17 Ibid., 81. 18 Ralph Nading Hill, College on the Hill (Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth Publications, 1964), 31. 19. George T. Chapman, Sketches of the Alumni of Dartmouth College (Cambridge: Riverside Press, 1867), 46. 20 Ibid., 33. 21 Hill, College on the Hill, 23. 22 John Wheelock, History of Dartmouth College and Moor's School (Hanover, N.H., 1815), 58 23 Ibid. 24 Chapman, Sketches of the Alumni, 13-150. (174) ...narrow definition of the elect of God could tolerate neither heresy. In 1803 Jesse was clearly in the Universalist camp, [25] Lucy was a still a bit Calvinist, and Joseph Sr. appears to be undecided. Joseph's willingness to attend Methodist meetings with Lucy suggests that they were both heading in that direction. [26] As Universalism began to fade in the region and Calvinist rigidity was on the rise, the Smith family began seeking for some satisfying alternative. The religious tension would begin to come to a climax in 1810 when control of the board of trustees of Dartmouth College shifted from a narrow Arminian to a narrow Calvinist majority. [27] Soon openly engaged disputation evolved into vehemently contested revivals. In the midst of this religious malaise in December 1805 Joseph Jr. was born on the Solomon Mack farm, which straddled the boundary between Royalton and Sharon, Vermont. There must have been some concern before Joseph's birth since Joseph Sr. made a twenty-four-mile round-trip to fetch Dr. Joseph Adams Denison from Bethel, Vermont, who was the best known baby doctor in the region. [28] Denison had been trained by his cousin Joseph Adams Gallup who had been the first graduate of the new Dartmouth Medical School, founded in 1796 by Nathan Smith. [29] (text deleted due to copyright restrictions) _________ 25 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 79. 26 Ibid. 27 Wheelock, History of Dartmouth College, 43. 28 Porter, "Origins of the Church," 7. 29 Oliver Hubbard, The Early History of the New Hampshire Medical Institution (Washington, D.C.: The Globe Printing and Publishing House, 1880), 14. 30 Ibid., 3. 31 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83, 32 Anderson, Joseph Smith's New England Heritage, 25. 33 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83-84. (pg. 173/174) A Spiritual Experience In 1803 Lucy also had her well-known seeker dream in which she first saw Joseph Sr.'s spiritual flexibility as a tree bending gracefully in the wind, preparing to receive the gospel of the Son of God as compared with Joseph's brother Jesse's resistance as a pillar of marble. [17] Lucy was clearly conflicted by this family situation. However, to begin to understand this dream it is necessary to review the context of the development of the religious discourse in the upper Connecticut and White River Valleys. In 1769 Eleazar Wheelook founded Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, to teach the Native Americans, prepare missionaries, and train ministers for the rapidly growing towns in the region [18] -- including Elijah Lyman [19] and Solomon Aikens, [20] uncles of Joseph Sr.'s later sisters-in-law, Clarissa Lyman and Mary Aikens. Spiritual Background of the Community Eleazar Wheelock was a Yale graduate and a product of the Great Awakening; he was mentored by Jonathan Edwards, a traditional Puritan Calvinist, and George Whitefield, a Methodist Arminian closely associated with John and Charles Wesley. [21] Wheelock leaned in the direction of the Arminian concept of free agency rather than the Calvinist concept of predestination. [22] He selectively used Edwards's work on the Freedom of the Will, which discussed both approaches, as his principal religious text. [23] Dartmouth trained hundreds of ministers in the region by the early 1800s. [24] Traditional Calvinism, however, gained increasing strength in the region by 1810 and vehemently opposed both Universalism, which applied Christ's Atonement broadly to everyone, and Arminianism, which applied the Atonement's highest degree of glory all those who would consecrate their lives to the service of Christ. Calvinism's narrow definition of the elect of God could tolerate neither heresy. In 1803 Jesse was clearly in the Universalist camp, [25] Lucy was a still a bit Calvinist, and Joseph Sr. appears to be undecided. Joseph's willingness to attend Methodist meetings with Lucy suggests that they were both heading in that direction. [26] As Universalism began to fade in the region and Calvinist rigidity was on the rise, the Smith family began seeking for some satisfying alternative. The religious tension would begin to come to a climax in 1810 when control of the board of trustees of Dartmouth College shifted from a narrow Arminian to a narrow Calvinist majority. [27] Soon openly engaged disputation evolved into vehemently contested revivals. In the midst of this religious malaise in December 1805 Joseph Jr. was born on the Solomon Mack farm, which straddled the boundary between Royalton and Sharon, Vermont. There must have been some concern before Joseph's birth since Joseph Sr. made a twenty-four-mile round-trip to fetch Dr. Joseph Adams Denison from Bethel, Vermont, who was the best known baby doctor in the region. [28] Denison had been trained by his cousin Joseph Adams Gallup who had been the first graduate of the new Dartmouth Medical School, founded in 1796 by Nathan Smith. [29] (text deleted due to copyright restrictions) The Dreams Begin In 1811 there was also a revival in the area that strongly affected Lucy's father, Solomon Mack, and caused him to write his history and embark upon on a preaching tour from town to town. [34] Joseph Sr. also reacted to the revival by having his first seeker dream in which he was uncomfortable with the images of bickering that, without true religion or a plan of salvation, were represented by fierce wild animals. Yet at the same time he was comfortable with his position. [35] This revival focused on many of the Calvinist vs. Arminian doctrinal issues that were continuing to be fiercely contested at nearby Dartmouth College. Joseph's focus on the plan of salvation appears to reflect his growing interest in Christ's atonement. For some reason in 1811 the Smith family moved on to Lebanon, New Hampshire, just south of Dartmouth. [36] Soon after arriving in Lebanon the Smith family was in sufficient financial condition to establish their second son, Hyrum, in the Moor's Academy at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. [37] Joseph Smith Sr. appeared to have approached Dartmouth Hall with a degree of anxiety as he dropped Hyrum off to join his cousin Stephen Mack at Moor's Academy. [38] The boarding school was probably Lucy's idea as she still wanted to keep up with Stephen, her brother, and his efforts to acquire the things of this world. Students were known to sit in the windows of the upper floors of Dartmouth Hall and look out and down on those approaching the tall building. Joseph Sr.'s feelings about leaving his son in such a situation are reflected in his concurrent dream that focused on family unity both in physical and spiritual terms challenged by the perceived appearance of Babylon to separate them. The dream dealt with his reluctant acceptance of the new situation. He appeared to be fascinated with the east-to-west-running Mascoma River behind their new home. When the guiding spirit explained that the tall building represented Babylon and that the people in the windows were the inhabitants thereof who scorn the saints of God because of their humility, [39] he was further concerned. In the new home, however, Joseph Sr. found the pure love of God shed abroad in the hearts of all those who love him and keep his commandments. [40] Also in 1812 Solomon Spaulding, who graduated from Dartmouth in 1785 completed his unpublished work on the origin of the Indians and reintroduced __________ 15 Ibid., 274. 16 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83. 17 Ibid., 81. 18 Ralph Nading Hill, College on the Hill (Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth Publications, 1964), 31. 19. George T. Chapman, Sketches of the Alumni of Dartmouth College (Cambridge: Riverside Press, 1867), 46. 20 Ibid., 33. 21 Hill, College on the Hill, 23. 22 John Wheelock, History of Dartmouth College and Moor's School (Hanover, N.H., 1815), 58 23 Ibid. 24 Chapman, Sketches of the Alumni, 13-150. 25 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 79. 26 Ibid. 27 Wheelock, History of Dartmouth College, 43. 28 Porter, "Origins of the Church," 7. 29 Oliver Hubbard, The Early History of the New Hampshire Medical Institution (Washington D.C.: The Globe Printing and Publishing House, 1880), 14. 30 Ibid., 3. 31 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83, 32 Anderson, Joseph Smith's New England Heritage, 25. 33 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 83-84. 34 Anderson, Joseph Smith's New England Heritage, 39. 35 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 85. 36 Ibid., 85. 37 Ibid., 90. 38 Moor's School Attendance Records, Rauner Special Collections library, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. 39 Smith, History of Joseph Smith, 88. ----------------------- Relative/Proxy: Joseph Smith Sr.- Messages from IGI Joseph Smith Sr. was sealed in 1870 SLC to Catherine Messary. (No marriage date and he was dead.) ----------------------- Portraits of the Past (Deseret News Thursday, November 25, 2010) Smith Farm - The Joseph Smith Sr. family moved to Staford Road on a site located a mile and a half south of Main Street in Palmyra Village, N.Y. Local records found by Larry C. Porter show that the Smiths were there by 1818 or 1819. However, it is not known exactly when they moved to that site from west Main Street. In any event, they were there before the First Vision of the Prophet Joseph. ----------------------- Sources: The Family of Joseph Smith by C. Cecil McGavin; LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, by Andrew Jensen; The Diaries and Journals of Joseph Smith, edited by Scott H. Faulring; and Buddy Youngren. Information compiled by Kevin Stoker. The 'first family' of the Restoration - Joseph Smith, Sr. -- (b. 1771, Massachusetts-d. 1840, Nauvoo, Ill.) Was first to say Joseph's visions of Moroni were of God; aided in printing of the Book of Mormon; served as one of the eight witnesses of the Book of Mormon; took gospel to extended family in New York; thrown in jail for a month because he wouldn't deny Book of Mormon; ordained Church patriarch in 1833; died of consumption; ". . .sitteth with Abraham at his right hand, and blessed and holy is he, for he is mine." (D&C 124:19.) ------------------ Official Web site of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints @2010 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • Sources 
    1. [S358] California, Los Angeles, ; Certified Abstract of Birth - 1977 - Larson, Tricia D, State of California - Department of Health, (Tricia D Larson certified abstract of birth, state file no. 19-0732955, local registration district no. O102898).