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ALLEN, Samuel Alonzo[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Male 1865 - 1935  (70 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document


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  • Name ALLEN, Samuel Alonzo 
    Born 13 Jan 1865  Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Gender Male 
    WAC 27 Oct 1892  MANTI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Died 26 Nov 1935  Bicknell, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 9
    Buried 30 Nov 1935  Lyman, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I54206  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Family ID F26659  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family HANKS, Thisbe ,   b. 28 Mar 1872, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Apr 1924, Lyman, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years) 
    Married 27 Oct 1892  Manti, Sanpete, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
    +1. ALLEN, Mattie ,   b. 8 Oct 1893, Grover, Wayne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 May 1933, Escalante, Garfield, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F21549  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 
    • Daniel and Louisa Jane Berry Allen original pioneers to Utah were the parents of Samuel Alonzo Allen. Daniel and Louisa traveled with the Samuel Gully/Orson Spencer Pioneer Company, which arrived in the valley between 22-24 September 1849. They had departed in June from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs), with about 100 wagons when it began its journey. Daniel and Louisa lived in Salt Lake City, Summit, Provo, Pleasant Grove and then Parowan, Utah where Samuel Alonzo Allen was born January 13, 1865.

      Sam was 16 years old when his family moved in 1881 from Parowan to Escalante, Utah. Daniel and Louisa spent the rest of their lives in Escalante. Daniel died January 17, 1892 at the age of 88 and Louisa died July 30, 1902 at the age of 74, both are buried in the Escalante Cemetery.

      In 1884 Samuel and his brother David along with William Spencer went over the Boulder Mountain from Escalante into Carcass Creek now known as Grover, Utah. The brothers bought claims (land) from Alex Keele and Will Bullard, the original settlers of Grover, for $500 paid in horses and mules for farming. While digging a ditch to divert water to places in the western part of Grover, the brothers discovered an old Anasazi Indian well.

      There were five families located in Grover in 1889. Samuel who lived with two bachelors, Brigham Spencer and Alpheus Higgans on one lot, and Sam’s brother David and his wife Martha Georgina Hanks on another lot were amongst those families.

      Ephraim K. and Thisbe Read Hanks also original pioneers to Utah, lived at Floral Ranch, on Pleasant Creek near Caineville, Utah and were the parents of Martha Georgina and Thisbe Hanks. These two sisters would marry brothers, Martha Georgina to David Allen and Thisbe to Samuel Allen.

      Samuel and Thisbe were married in the Manti Temple on October 27, 1892. They bought a farm on Carcass Creek and built a one-room house. Their first child, a girl they named Mattie was born October 8, 1893, then they had another girl, named Amy Lousia on February 1, 1895, then another girl, named Hazel Dell on June 27, 1896. All were born here at Carcass Creek (Grover, Utah).

      In 1896, Thisbe lost her father Ephraim K. Hanks on June 9th at the age of 70, then in October Samuel was called to serve a Mormon Mission to the Southern States, “this calling seemed quite hard, as they were in quite strained circumstances,” Mattie wrote in her history. Amy wrote of this time,“Mother was sick in bed with a breast infection, but the Lord blessed her and she was healed.” Samuel left Thisbe and his three daughters, Mattie, Amy and Hazel to serve. Thisbe rented out the farm, ran the post office, and rented a room to a schoolteacher by the name of Miss Hancock to provide for her children and for Sam while he served his mission. Sam was on his mission for exactly two years to the day leaving and returning on the same day, October 2, 1896-1898. “She (Thisbe) never wanted or was in need for a thing in the two years Father was gone,” Amy wrote. Thisbe did not expect Samuel would be home so soon thinking that he would stay in Salt Lake and attend General Conference which was in session, but Charlie Giles brought him directly home.

      Their first son, Samuel Fahey was born June 24, 1899 while they still lived at Carcass Creek. In February 1900 the Samuel traded the farm on Carcass Creek to Deseret Hickman and moved to Caineville, Utah, he had two orchards, a field, and a two-room house. Samuel was a farmer but they also raised fruit but the need for fresh fruit was limited so they dried it. This was also where Thisbe’s family was, Thisbe’s mother had a house just one block away from them, and her brother Walter E. Hanks was serving as Bishop of the Caineville Ward. Their second son Ruben was born March 3, 1902.

      While they lived in Caineville, Thisbe Read Hanks, wife of Ephraim, and mother to Samuel’s wife Thisbe died July 23, 1903 at the young age of 58 of gallstones, Mattie wrote, “Her death was such a shock to my Mother that she almost died.” Ephraim and Thisbe Read Hanks are both buried in the Caineville Cemetery.

      Samuel was elected as Wayne County Surveyor in 1903 and held that office until 1907.

      The following winter Ethan Arthur whom they always call “Pete” was born February 23, 1904. Samuel and Thisbe became discontented with Caineville, so in the spring Samuel traded for another farm from Alfred Ostberg, two and a half miles north of Teasdale. Walter Ernest was born May 25, 1906, he was known as “Ted.”

      When Samuel first went to the Teasdale house he took little Sammy with him and they had to sleep on the floor. One morning while Samuel was dressing he discovered a rattlesnake curled up under the edge of his pillow. He finished dressing, then took the snake still curled up, on the shovel and carried it across the river and turned it loose saying “it did not harm me, so I will not harm it.” Rattlesnakes were quite a problem and they eventually bit their best milk cow and their two dogs and all had died. Another strange thing happen shortly thereafter. The rats were very numerous and Samuel and Sammy could hardly sleep at night because of the noise, so Samuel put cyanide on some bread and during the night a rat dragged the poisonous bread into a pan of milk. The next morning Samuel noticed the bread in the milk and not thinking of the poison ate the bread. He became very sick during the day and remembered the bread, so he sought out to find the bait he had set out for the rats and it was not where he had put it and realized the rats had moved it to the milk and he had eaten it. Mattie wrote, “he suffered in agony for a day or two, he administered to himself and through constant faith and prayer, he recovered. All his hair came out and he grew very thin.”

      Mattie wrote that she was just 11 years old when they went to the new ranch. “At first Father took Mattie and Sammy with him to help plant crops,” Amy wrote. Samuel, Mattie and little Sammy, helped with the cattle and the moving of the house, because the house was in a swampy area, Samuel moved it to the bench. “I helped Father cook and Sam and I herded and milked cows, while Father was off helping different men hay,” Mattie wrote. The rest of the family moved to the farm in Teasdale, September of 1906 where they lived for three and a half years. Amy wrote “It was very lonesome for Mother and she was quite tied with little ones.” This house was situated directly between Teasdale and Torrey, but they were considered to be in the Teasdale Ward. Samuel served in the bishopric while living here. On the ranch they took great pride in their gardens, they had good water, and Mattie and Amy planted silver maple trees around the house and the canal. Paul Knowlton, their fifth son was born here April 17, 1908. “Summer afternoons when we were at home, we would go fishing. Sometimes we made a good catch, other times we got nothing,” Mattie wrote.

      Then Samuel traded places again and the family moved in 1908 to Lyman, Utah 12 miles away from where they were living. “Father loved farming,” Amy wrote, and this house and farm was much bigger making more room from their family. However, the water was unhealthly and that winter Thisbe, Mattie, Ruben, Ethan, and Ted were all stricken with typhoid fever. There were many cases in town but only on death. Lyman was first settled as East Loa, then Willmoth, and finally Lyman after the Apostle Francis M. Lyman.

      April 5, 1910, their sixth son was born, Ephraim Hanks, but he was always known as “Rex.” To round out the family Samuel and Thisbe had two more children, Lloyd born March 3, 1912 and Ruth born January 16, 1914, 11 children in all.

      Thisbe Hanks Allen was able to see four of her children married, Mattie, Amy, Hazel, and Samuel F. before she died, April 3, 1924 at the young age of 52 years.

      After Thisbe died, Samuel lived with one then another of his children. He spent most of the first two years in Escalante because his youngest children lived with Mattie who had moved here and had married Parley Pratt Porter. But when Mattie’s health wasn’t very good, Samuel brought the children back to the Lyman farm. Samuel’s sons found work and left home, so Samuel and the baby Ruth went to live with Amy. When Mattie’s health improved Lloyd and Ruth went back to Escalante to live with her, but Samuel stayed at Amy’s.

      As time went on Samuel began working at the Manti Temple where he met a woman by the name of Alice Bradley and married her in Richfield, Utah on October 12, 1934. While he was there he “took a pain in his chest” which caused him much distress. He went back to live with Amy and Alice went back to Manti to live and work at the temple. Samuel’s marriage to Alice was kept a secret. Alice had been married already three times and she didn’t want her children to know she had married for a fourth time.

      Samuel went back to Manti in the winter of 1934, but his health was poor and he couldn’t work very much at the temple. In August of 1935 when the temple closed, Samuel came back to live with Amy. “Father’s health continued to fail, but he hadn’t stayed a day in bed,” Amy wrote.

      The last morning he lived, he arose as usual and helped Amy with the housework until 4:30 p.m. He laid on the couch to rest and passed away at 5:00 p.m. November 26, 1935 at the age of 70. They had trouble getting the family together because the family was so scattered. Paul and Pete were on the Henry Mountains, Sam and Lloyd were in the lower county with the sheep, Ruben was in Idaho, Ted in Millard County and Mattie, Rex, and Ruth in Escalante. “We had to keep him for four days before he was buried, even then Ruben and Ted didn’t make it to the funeral,” Amy wrote.

      Samuel Alonzo and Thisbe Hanks Allen were active members in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Richfield Reaper reported in the July 31, 1920 issue through the Bicknell correspondent “Brother Samuel Allen and his wife of Lyman preached very good sermons at the afternoon services here last Sunday.” Samuel also was on the high council of the Wayne Stake and traveled on occasion with William Blackburn, Brigham Reese, and R. A. Meeks, to different Wards as representatives of the stake. Samuel was in the bishopric twice, on the High Council, and was a Sunday School Superintendent.


      Complied by L. Royce Allen and Debra Young







      Sources

      “My History of My Life,” by Mattie Allen Porter

      “Life Story of Amy Allen White,” by Amy Allen White

      “Rainbow Views, A History of Wayne County,” by Anne Snow

      “The Richfield Reaper” Newspaper


      Daniel and Louisa Jane Berry Allen original pioneers to Utah were the parents of Samuel Alonzo Allen. Daniel and Louisa traveled with the Samuel Gully/Orson Spencer Pioneer Company, which arrived in the valley between 22-24 September 1849. They had departed in June from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs), with about 100 wagons when it began its journey. Daniel and Louisa lived in Salt Lake City, Summit, Provo, Pleasant Grove and then Parowan, Utah where Samuel Alonzo Allen was born January 13, 1865.

      Sam was 16 years old when his family moved in 1881 from Parowan to Escalante, Utah. Daniel and Louisa spent the rest of their lives in Escalante. Daniel died January 17, 1892 at the age of 88 and Louisa died July 30, 1902 at the age of 74, both are buried in the Escalante Cemetery.

      In 1884 Samuel and his brother David along with William Spencer went over the Boulder Mountain from Escalante into Carcass Creek now known as Grover, Utah. The brothers bought claims (land) from Alex Keele and Will Bullard, the original settlers of Grover, for $500 paid in horses and mules for farming. While digging a ditch to divert water to places in the western part of Grover, the brothers discovered an old Anasazi Indian well.

      There were five families located in Grover in 1889. Samuel who lived with two bachelors, Brigham Spencer and Alpheus Higgans on one lot, and Sam’s brother David and his wife Martha Georgina Hanks on another lot were amongst those families.

      Ephraim K. and Thisbe Read Hanks also original pioneers to Utah, lived at Floral Ranch, on Pleasant Creek near Caineville, Utah and were the parents of Martha Georgina and Thisbe Hanks. These two sisters would marry brothers, Martha Georgina to David Allen and Thisbe to Samuel Allen.

      Samuel and Thisbe were married in the Manti Temple on October 27, 1892. They bought a farm on Carcass Creek and built a one-room house. Their first child, a girl they named Mattie was born October 8, 1893, then they had another girl, named Amy Lousia on February 1, 1895, then another girl, named Hazel Dell on June 27, 1896. All were born here at Carcass Creek (Grover, Utah).

      In 1896, Thisbe lost her father Ephraim K. Hanks on June 9th at the age of 70, then in October Samuel was called to serve a Mormon Mission to the Southern States, “this calling seemed quite hard, as they were in quite strained circumstances,” Mattie wrote in her history. Amy wrote of this time,“Mother was sick in bed with a breast infection, but the Lord blessed her and she was healed.” Samuel left Thisbe and his three daughters, Mattie, Amy and Hazel to serve. Thisbe rented out the farm, ran the post office, and rented a room to a schoolteacher by the name of Miss Hancock to provide for her children and for Sam while he served his mission. Sam was on his mission for exactly two years to the day leaving and returning on the same day, October 2, 1896-1898. “She (Thisbe) never wanted or was in need for a thing in the two years Father was gone,” Amy wrote. Thisbe did not expect Samuel would be home so soon thinking that he would stay in Salt Lake and attend General Conference which was in session, but Charlie Giles brought him directly home.

      Their first son, Samuel Fahey was born June 24, 1899 while they still lived at Carcass Creek. In February 1900 the Samuel traded the farm on Carcass Creek to Deseret Hickman and moved to Caineville, Utah, he had two orchards, a field, and a two-room house. Samuel was a farmer but they also raised fruit but the need for fresh fruit was limited so they dried it. This was also where Thisbe’s family was, Thisbe’s mother had a house just one block away from them, and her brother Walter E. Hanks was serving as Bishop of the Caineville Ward. Their second son Ruben was born March 3, 1902.

      While they lived in Caineville, Thisbe Read Hanks, wife of Ephraim, and mother to Samuel’s wife Thisbe died July 23, 1903 at the young age of 58 of gallstones, Mattie wrote, “Her death was such a shock to my Mother that she almost died.” Ephraim and Thisbe Read Hanks are both buried in the Caineville Cemetery.

      Samuel was elected as Wayne County Surveyor in 1903 and held that office until 1907.

      The following winter Ethan Arthur whom they always call “Pete” was born February 23, 1904. Samuel and Thisbe became discontented with Caineville, so in the spring Samuel traded for another farm from Alfred Ostberg, two and a half miles north of Teasdale. Walter Ernest was born May 25, 1906, he was known as “Ted.”

      When Samuel first went to the Teasdale house he took little Sammy with him and they had to sleep on the floor. One morning while Samuel was dressing he discovered a rattlesnake curled up under the edge of his pillow. He finished dressing, then took the snake still curled up, on the shovel and carried it across the river and turned it loose saying “it did not harm me, so I will not harm it.” Rattlesnakes were quite a problem and they eventually bit their best milk cow and their two dogs and all had died. Another strange thing happen shortly thereafter. The rats were very numerous and Samuel and Sammy could hardly sleep at night because of the noise, so Samuel put cyanide on some bread and during the night a rat dragged the poisonous bread into a pan of milk. The next morning Samuel noticed the bread in the milk and not thinking of the poison ate the bread. He became very sick during the day and remembered the bread, so he sought out to find the bait he had set out for the rats and it was not where he had put it and realized the rats had moved it to the milk and he had eaten it. Mattie wrote, “he suffered in agony for a day or two, he administered to himself and through constant faith and prayer, he recovered. All his hair came out and he grew very thin.”

      Mattie wrote that she was just 11 years old when they went to the new ranch. “At first Father took Mattie and Sammy with him to help plant crops,” Amy wrote. Samuel, Mattie and little Sammy, helped with the cattle and the moving of the house, because the house was in a swampy area, Samuel moved it to the bench. “I helped Father cook and Sam and I herded and milked cows, while Father was off helping different men hay,” Mattie wrote. The rest of the family moved to the farm in Teasdale, September of 1906 where they lived for three and a half years. Amy wrote “It was very lonesome for Mother and she was quite tied with little ones.” This house was situated directly between Teasdale and Torrey, but they were considered to be in the Teasdale Ward. Samuel served in the bishopric while living here. On the ranch they took great pride in their gardens, they had good water, and Mattie and Amy planted silver maple trees around the house and the canal. Paul Knowlton, their fifth son was born here April 17, 1908. “Summer afternoons when we were at home, we would go fishing. Sometimes we made a good catch, other times we got nothing,” Mattie wrote.

      Then Samuel traded places again and the family moved in 1908 to Lyman, Utah 12 miles away from where they were living. “Father loved farming,” Amy wrote, and this house and farm was much bigger making more room from their family. However, the water was unhealthly and that winter Thisbe, Mattie, Ruben, Ethan, and Ted were all stricken with typhoid fever. There were many cases in town but only on death. Lyman was first settled as East Loa, then Willmoth, and finally Lyman after the Apostle Francis M. Lyman.

      April 5, 1910, their sixth son was born, Ephraim Hanks, but he was always known as “Rex.” To round out the family Samuel and Thisbe had two more children, Lloyd born March 3, 1912 and Ruth born January 16, 1914, 11 children in all.

      Thisbe Hanks Allen was able to see four of her children married, Mattie, Amy, Hazel, and Samuel F. before she died, April 3, 1924 at the young age of 52 years.

      After Thisbe died, Samuel lived with one then another of his children. He spent most of the first two years in Escalante because his youngest children lived with Mattie who had moved here and had married Parley Pratt Porter. But when Mattie’s health wasn’t very good, Samuel brought the children back to the Lyman farm. Samuel’s sons found work and left home, so Samuel and the baby Ruth went to live with Amy. When Mattie’s health improved Lloyd and Ruth went back to Escalante to live with her, but Samuel stayed at Amy’s.

      As time went on Samuel began working at the Manti Temple where he met a woman by the name of Alice Bradley and married her in Richfield, Utah on October 12, 1934. While he was there he “took a pain in his chest” which caused him much distress. He went back to live with Amy and Alice went back to Manti to live and work at the temple. Samuel’s marriage to Alice was kept a secret. Alice had been married already three times and she didn’t want her children to know she had married for a fourth time.

      Samuel went back to Manti in the winter of 1934, but his health was poor and he couldn’t work very much at the temple. In August of 1935 when the temple closed, Samuel came back to live with Amy. “Father’s health continued to fail, but he hadn’t stayed a day in bed,” Amy wrote.

      The last morning he lived, he arose as usual and helped Amy with the housework until 4:30 p.m. He laid on the couch to rest and passed away at 5:00 p.m. November 26, 1935 at the age of 70. They had trouble getting the family together because the family was so scattered. Paul and Pete were on the Henry Mountains, Sam and Lloyd were in the lower county with the sheep, Ruben was in Idaho, Ted in Millard County and Mattie, Rex, and Ruth in Escalante. “We had to keep him for four days before he was buried, even then Ruben and Ted didn’t make it to the funeral,” Amy wrote.

      Samuel Alonzo and Thisbe Hanks Allen were active members in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Richfield Reaper reported in the July 31, 1920 issue through the Bicknell correspondent “Brother Samuel Allen and his wife of Lyman preached very good sermons at the afternoon services here last Sunday.” Samuel also was on the high council of the Wayne Stake and traveled on occasion with William Blackburn, Brigham Reese, and R. A. Meeks, to different Wards as representatives of the stake. Samuel was in the bishopric twice, on the High Council, and was a Sunday School Superintendent.


      Complied by L. Royce Allen and Debra Young







      Sources

      “My History of My Life,” by Mattie Allen Porter

      “Life Story of Amy Allen White,” by Amy Allen White

      “Rainbow Views, A History of Wayne County,” by Anne Snow

      “The Richfield Reaper” Newspaper

      Told by himself to his daughter Lydia Okerlund Chappell Nov. 23 1936

      I was born in Gunnison Sept. 17, 1870 in a frame building of three rooms for these days it was considered modern and as good as the average

      Father had a good farm a few cattle, and a team of horses. He was a blacksmith by trade. I started school at the age of six in Gunnison. My first teacher was Mrs. Croft, she was a nice kind teacher. One day I played on the school ground I didn't have time to go home for dinner, she gave me her lunch. I attended school until I was sixteen years old. I went through the highest grade known as the history grade..

      I was ordained as Deacon at the age of 12 years, Elder at the age of 24 years by Willis E Robinson, seventy at the age of 26 years by John E. Smith. I was called on a mission to the native country of my father, Sweden. I left on Oct. 15, 1896 and come home on Dec. 15, 1898. When I first come home I was called as a home missionary where I worked for three years. I was then ordained a High Priest on Nov. 12 1901 by Apostal W.F. Cowley and called to work as second counselor to Bishop J. H. Cook, Archie Oldroyd being first counselor . While we worked in the Bishopric we helped to put the telephone line in. In 1906, J. H. Cook was released and George A Chappell Sr. was put in Bishop with Archie Oldroyd and me as his counselors. While we were in the Bishopric the Amusement Hall (what is now the chapel part of the Lyman Church House) was built. We worked unitedly together until Dec 24, 1912.

      I then worked as first counselor to Bishop Archie Oldroyd, George A Chappell Jr. as second counselor. While we were in the Bishopric the Lyman Water works were put in and helped to build the school house. We worked together until May 3, 1925. (Grandpa Okerlund served three Bishops as counselor for total of 24 years). I was appointed Superintendent of Sunday School Feb 4, 1926 with S.A. Allen first assistant and Frank Buchannan second asst. and Matie Allen as Sec. Other positions I have held: Chairman of Music, Recreation, Genealogy and Ward Teacher.

      On Aug 23, 1927 I was chosen as Second counselor to William H. Morell of the Stake High Priest Quorum where I worked until Nov, 4, 1928 when I was chosen as a member of High Counsel set apart by Apostal Melvin J Ballard.

      One promise made in my Patriarchal Blessing was that I should be called on a Mission to my parents native land Scandinavia. I was given the promise that I should go in peace and return in safety and friends should be raised up to administer to my wants, and the way should be made open for me. On my mission I was blessed of the Lord in many ways. I had to learn the language after I arrived in Sweden in which I was greatly blessed.

      While traveling at Tlenslit we had a very strange experience. One day we attended a meeting held by denomination called Bible Readers, their preacher talked for a period of one and a half hrs. In his sermon he warned the people to beware of Wolves in sheep's clothing this and other things he said took a warning to the people against us as Mormon Elders and our message to them. At the close of the meeting we ask the proprietor of the building if we might hold a meeting here. Our request was granted and we had the privilege of perching the gospel and also defending ourselves against what the minster had said at the close of the meeting we distributed our tracts among the people of the congregation including the minister who had delivered the sermon. Upon receiving the tract he became enraged and walked out of the building with some of his followers. Shortly after this he was taken ill very suddenly and within a few hours he died. Some of the people of the vicinity carried the idea that we Mormons had a power with us which was the cause of the ministers death so we were not permitted to hold more meetings in that vicinity

  • Sources 
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    3. [S232] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Wa), Year: 1910; Census Place: Lyman, Wayne, Utah; Roll: T624_1610; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0214; Image: ; FHL microfilm: 1375623.

    4. [S164] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,), Year: 1930; Census Place: Escalante, Garfield, Utah; Roll: 2416; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 4; Image: 27.0; FHL microfilm: 2342150.

    5. [S163] Web: Western States Marriage Index, 1809-2011, (Online publication - Brigham Young University–Idaho.).
      Marriage date: 1892 Marriage place: Sanpete, Utah
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    6. [S803] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Recor), Year: 1870; Census Place: District 7 Parowan, Iron, Utah Territory; Roll: M593_; Page: ; Image: .

    7. [S192] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Rec), Year: 1920; Census Place: Lyman, Wayne, Utah; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image: .

    8. [S170] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data - Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 23 March 2012.Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-) (Reliability: 0).

    9. [S429] Unknown, Ancestry.com, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.Original data - Bureau of Vital Statistics. Utah Death Index, 1847-1966. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Utah Department of Health. View Complete Source List.Original data: Bureau of Vital St) (Reliability: 0).