JosephSmithSr.
So shall it be with my father: he shall be
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council with the Ancient of Days when he shall sit and all the patriarchs with him and shall
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WILDING, George[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]

Male 1829 - 1913  (83 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document


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  • Name WILDING, George 
    Born 9 Nov 1829  Preston, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
    Gender Male 
    WAC 4 Sep 1857  EHOUS Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Died 26 Jul 1913  Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
    Buried 28 Jul 1913  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 13, 14, 15
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I55651  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Family ID F27072  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Father WILDING, David ,   b. 24 Nov 1804, Longton, Penwortham, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Oct 1890, Crescent, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Mother ATKINSON, Alice ,   b. 8 Apr 1810, Bilsborough, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1876, Florence, Douglas, Nebraska, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Married 23 Oct 1828  Preston, St John, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F27073  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 LAYNE, Mary Elizabeth ,   b. 24 Dec 1832, Bowling Green, Clay, Indiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1909, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 30 Jun 1850  Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 9
    Children 
    +1. WILDING, Rosilpha ,   b. 4 Jan 1857, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Dec 1934, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F24224  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 WINNER, Leoni Leoti ,   b. 15 Jul 1857, Six Mile Creek, Pike, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Nov 1933, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 9 Aug 1857  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F27071  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Fisher England
    George Wilding and sister Sarah Wilding
    George Wilding and sister Sarah Wilding

  • Notes 
    • As given to Dora Trueblood 12 hours before his death with additional notes by Florence E. Webb. Arranged and re-written by Francis Webb, son of Florence W. E. Webb

      George Wilding was (born?) on William Street November 9, 1829 at 6:00am in Preston Lane, England. He was a son of David Wilding who was born November 24, 1804 and Alice Atkinson born April 8, 1810. His Grandfather Henry Wilding was a traveling salesman and came from a castle in the north of England. In earlier times these people were wealthy but lost in law suit and had all their wealth placed in chancery.

      David and Alice Wilding heard the gospel preached and were baptized in 1838. A little later, in 1838 or 1839 George was baptized in the river Ribble in England by his father David Wilding and was confirmed by David Wilding and Thomas Richardson. On February 1, 1841, George left his home in England and on February 16th he sailed for America on the ship Echo. He landed at Nauvoo May 1, 1841.

      The first person he became acquainted with in Nauvoo was the Prophet Joseph Smith, he often held his horses, John and Joe, On one occasion the Prophet blessed him saying, "David (speaking to George's father) this is you son, and he will be a great blessing to you." At this time George was twelve or thirteen years old and wondered what was meant by the blessing. Later, however, his father left the church and died an apostate and George was baptized for him as well as his Grandfather and Great Grandfather, both of whom were named Henry.

      After this occurrence he decided that his being able to perform this ordinance for them must have been the indicated blessing.

      The first boy George became acquainted with while in Nauvoo was Nelson Empy. Mrs. Empy made the first corn bread he had ever tasted. His own mother used to make oatmeal pancakes which she would string and hang from the ceiling to dry. These were later used in oatmeal porridge.

      When he was 13 or 14 years old he worked for the prophet and knew he was a man of God. This testimony never left him. He saw Joseph Smith when they were taking him to Carthage. The prophet, on seeing him, stopped and gave George his hand, "Be of good cheer and a good boy George, and the Lord will bless you." The memory of the Prophet was ever dear to him.

      George's Grandfather was a drinker. Whenever disappointments would come in to his life, he would call his wife, Betty and say to her "Get my check when it comes, pay the bills and put what you don't need in the bank." He would then go off and drink for a period of time. When he would come back home he would ask his wife how everything was by saying to her, "How goes it Betty?" and she would answer "All right." Then he would say "How about the money?" She would then tell him all what she had done and he would say, "That's a good lassie."

      On June 30, 1850 George Wilding and Elizabeth Layne were married by Orson Hyde in the post office at Janesville, Iowa, now called Council Bluffs. Two wagon loads of people came to his place at Pigeon to celebrate the event with a dinner. At the time of his marriage he had only fifty cents cash, and his wife had eighty-five cents. He gave his fifty cents to the man for marrying them.

      After the wedding supper ended, the girls took his wife to their rooms and put her to bed and the boys took him and did likewise. Thus ended the celebration.

      They had a log home with a bunk bed built for a bed, this was made by boring holes at two different places in the walls and nailing a post in the floor for the other corner. They then stretched rawhide across the bottom and then placed a straw tick(?) on top. On the tick they had a sheet and two quilts. A frying pan and two tin plates composed their household dishes.

      One night George dreamed he saw his wife's father come out of the grave and say to him he was glad he, George, had married Elizabeth and that he would be the means of salvation in the kingdom of God. All this was shown very plainly and vividly.

      Their first child, a boy they called George, was born June 5, 1851 at their home in Pigeon Pottawa tome(?) les(?) Iowa.

      When the family needed money to emigrate to Utah, George went to Oregon City, Missouri where he worked on a farm drying (this meant digging) sweet potatoes. The men working with him were cursing the Mormons. One night he said to them, "You should be men of understanding. I am but a boy, but I am a Mormon and it hurts me to hear you speak that way. Please do not curse my people." They stopped their profanity and cursing against the Mormons and he never heard any more of it.

      He and his wife and son crossed the plains in the company of Ben E. Gardner. They had an old wagon with a horse and a cow hooked together. They started in the Spring of 1852. They crossed the Missouri River on June 24, 1852 and arrived in Great Salt Lake City, September 24, 1852 after a journey very long and hard of four months. Fourteen of their company died on the way of cholera. George and Horace Owens were the hunters for the company. One day when they were returning to the camp with all thereat they could carry, they passed a spot where they counted 130 new graves. One-man had been wrapped in a feather bed when he was buried and the wolves had party pulled i out of the ground. George put his foot to turn the face up so he could see who it was when corruption came up and he smelled the terrible odor of cholera and he contracted the disease. During the night as he lay almost dead in camp, he heard the Captain outside his tent say they would have to stop overnight or a day to bury George. He shouted out between gasps, "No you won't! I will live!" He remembered the words of his father, who was a doctor, that a strong glass of whiskey would cure cholera. Elizabeth went to the camp of Horace Owens and got the whiskey. Into the whiskey she put black pepper. He drank the full glass and recovered.

      After they arrived in Utah, they settled in the Sixteenth Ward. That winter was a very severe one. Their second son was born in a wagon during that winter. During his first year George worked at the trade of a mason and there are still many houses standing that he built.

      In 1853 he built his home in the Nineteenth Ward and moved there. Here 11 children were born.

      He was called to Echo Canyon in the Spring of 1858 to assist against Johnston's Army, which had been sent out to west to subdue the Mormons.

      In August 9, 1875, he was married in polygamy to Leoni Leoti Winner by whom he had 12 children. His second wife's home was in Hunter Ward, Salt Lake County. At his 70th birthday he was the father of 25 children, 140 grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

      From September 21, 1887 to March 21, 1888 he was imprisoned for practicing polygamy. He told many stories of prison life. David Bybee, a relative and dear friend, was serving at the same time. David had been placed with the criminals and suffered much by their rude language, etc. He asked George who had been more fortunate, to intercede for him. George did this and was successful in having David placed in the same cell he occupied. They were much more happy together and were favored by being allowed to eat with the guards and so, had much better food that the other prisoners. While the war confined, he raised pigs for the prison. When he was released he asked for two of them for himself and they were given to him. In this way he acquired a start of good pigs for himself.

      He cradled grain on the farms and in this way secured grain for his family. He kept bees and so received his sweets. He was a member of the Tabernacle Choir for many years and he loved to sing.

      He died July 26, 1912 in his 84th year at his home in Hunter. Funeral services were held at the Hunter Ward and burial in Salt Lake City, Utah Cemetery.

      Florence Emery Webb is first cousin to Elsie Burdette Knight


      Birth: Nov. 9, 1829
      Lancashire, England
      Death: Jul. 26, 1913
      Hunter
      Salt Lake County
      Utah, USA


      Family links:
      Parents:
      David Wilding (1804 - 1890)
      Alice Atkinson Wilding (1810 - 1876)

      Spouses:
      Mary Elizabeth Layne Wilding (1832 - 1909)
      Lena Leoti Winner Wilding (1857 - 1933)*

      Children:
      George Wilding (1851 - 1898)*
      Mary Alice Wilding Widdison (1854 - 1919)*
      Rosilpha Wilding Emery (1857 - 1934)*
      Elizabeth Ann Wilding Burdette (1859 - 1935)*
      Jeanetta Wilding Poulton (1860 - 1939)*
      Eleanor Wilding Love (1864 - 1946)*
      Maggie Wilding Timpson (1866 - 1941)*
      Eva Wilding Emery (1870 - 1957)*
      Olive Wilding (1873 - 1875)*
      Walter Layne Wilding (1875 - 1964)*
      Alice Isabella Wilding Fox (1876 - 1956)*
      Anna Wilding (1878 - 1878)*
      Mary Latilla Wilding Hadfield (1879 - 1951)*
      Jennie Leoni Wilding Rushton (1881 - 1934)*
      Elvira Naoma Wilding Hayden (1883 - 1918)*
      Rhoda Wilding Reed (1886 - 1973)*
      George Lambert Wilding (1888 - 1969)*
      Elizabeth Jeffs Wilding (1891 - 1903)*
      Erma Wilding **** (1893 - 1989)*
      Leoni Leoti Wilding Patterson (1896 - 1973)*
      Clara Cornelia Wilding **** (1898 - 1970)*
      Evelyn Winner Wilding Lyst (1901 - 1986)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Burial:
      Salt Lake City Cemetery
      Salt Lake City
      Salt Lake County
      Utah, USA
      Plot: N_20_3_2_WS2

      By Walter Layne Wilding (son)

      Arriving in Nauvoo he met the Prophet Joseph Smith with whom he became well acquainted. He often held the Prophet's horses, John and Joe. At one time the Prophet laid his hands upon George's head and said, speaking to his father, "David, this is your son and he will be a great blessing to you." George Wilding was then eleven years old and he wondered what this meant; but his father later left the church and died an apostate. George was later baptized for his father, grandfather and great-grandfather, this must have been the blessing the Prophet meant. He saw the Prophet when they were taking him to Carthage jail. The Prophet stopped, gave George his hand, and said, "Be a good boy, George, and the Lord will bless you." The memory of the Prophet was very dear to him. He was given a strong testimony of the divinity of the Prophet's mission. At the age of fifteen, he with his father's family was driven from their home leaving their land and belongings behind them. They arrived in Winter Quarters on November 7, 1847.

      By Walter Layne Wilding (son)

      George Wilding was born at Williams Street, Preston, England, November 9, 1829. His father was David Wilding and his mother, Alice Atkinson. His grandfather was Henry Wilding. His forefathers were mostly fanning people and were at one time well to do. George had 6 brothers and 4 sisters: Elizabeth A, James, Heber, David, Joseph, Jennetta, Henry, Alice, Thomas, and Sarah Ellen. The family joined the church in 1838. His father, was baptized by Heber C. Kimball and George was baptized by his father at the age of nine in the River Ribble. He was confirmed by his father, David, and Thomas Richardson. On February 16, 1841 he with his family left England on the sailing ship, Echo.


      George Wilding, Sr. - 1829-1913
      Born at Williams Street, Preston, England, November 9, 1829. Father, David Wilding; Mother, Alice Atkinson; Grandfather, Henry Wilding.
      George Wilding left England, February 16, 1841. He was baptized in 1839, in the River Ribble, England by his father, David Wilding and Thomas Richardson. His father and mother joined the Church in 1838. Following are the names of his brothers and sisters: Elizabeth A., James, Heber, David, Joseph, Jenneta, Henry, Alice, Thomas and Sarah Ellen.
      The Prophet Joseph Smith was the first man he became acquainted with in Nauvoo. He often held the Prophet's horses (John and Joe). At one time the Prophet laid his hands upon George's head and said, speaking to his father, "David, this is your son and he will be a great blessing to you." George Wilding was then eleven years old and he wondered what this meant; but his father later left the Church and died an apostate. Since he was baptized for his father, also his grandfather and great-grandfather, this must have been the blessing the Prophet meant.
      George Wilding was married to Mary Elizabeth Layne on June 30, 1850, by Orson Hyde in the Post Office at Kanesville, Iowa - now Council Bluffs. Two wagon loads went and returned to celebrate with a dinner at this home in Pigeon. He had only fifty cents and his wife seventy-five cents. He gave his fifty cents to the man for marrying them. They had one log room with a bunk built in for a bed, which was made by boring two holes in the wall and nailing a post to the floor for the two other corners. They stretched raw hide across for the bottom and on this placed a straw tick, a sheet and two quilts. A frying pan and two plates was their household equipment.
      George Wilding dreamed that he saw his wife's father come up from his grave and say he was glad he had married Elizabeth and that he would be the means of her salvation in the Kingdom of God. They had thirteen children as follows: George, David, Mary Alice, Roselpha, Elizabeth Ann, Jennetta, Preston, Eleanor, Maggie, Henry David, Eve, Olive and Water Layne.
      When he needed money to take his family to Utah, George went to Oregon, Missouri, and worked on a farm digging sweet potatoes. The men working with him were cursing the Mormons and one night he said to them, "You should be men of understanding. I am but a boy But I am a Mormon and it hurts me to hear you speak that way. Please do not curse my people before me." They stopped and he never heard any more of it.
      When George was about 13 or 14 years old, he worked for the Prophet of God and his testimony never left him. He saw the Prophet when they were taking him to Carthage Jail. The Prophet stopped, gave George his hand and said, "Be a good boy, George, and the Lord will bless you." The memory of the Prophet was very dear to him.
      He and his wife and son crossed the plains with the Ben E. Gardiner Company. The Company left Kanesville, Iowa, on May 15, 1852 consisting of 241 people and 45 wagons. Fourteen of their number died on the way of cholera. George's wagon was drawn by one horse and one cow.
      George Wilding and Horace Owens were the hunters for the immigrant train, securing wild meat such as buffalo, elk, deer, etc. In those days their firearms were muzzle loading, which would take about five minutes to reload. There were thousands of buffalo in Wyoming, so there was no meat problem at that time. One day when they were returning to camp with all the meat they could carry, they passed a spot where there were many new graves. They counted 130. One man had been wrapped in a feather bed when buried and the wolves had partly pulled it out of the ground. George put his foot out to turn the face up so he could see who it was. The corruption came out and he smelled the terrible odor of cholera. He contracted the terrible disease. During the night as he lay almost dead in the camp, he heard the Captain outside say, "We will stop over tomorrow to bury George." Between gasps, George said, "No you won't. I will live." He remembered his father's words, "Take strong whiskey for cholera." (David Wilding was a doctor) George's wife, Elizabeth went to the camp of Horace Owens and got whiskey as Horace was night watching. Into the glass of whiskey she put black pepper. He drank it and was able to continue his journey.
      When they arrived in Utah, on September 24, 1852, they settled in the 16th Ward for one winter and George worked at his trade as mason. There are many houses still standing which he built. In 1853, he built his house in the 19th Ward and moved into it.
      On August 9, 1875, he married Leona Leoti Winner, in polygamy, by whom he had twelve children, as follows: Alice Isabella, Anna, Latilla, Jennie Leoni, Elvira Naomi, Rhoda Lambert, George Lambert, Elizabeth Jeffs, Erma Estella, Leni Leoti, Clara Cornelia and Evelyn Winner. His second wife's home was in Hunter Ward, Salt Lake County. On his 70th birthday, his family numbered 25 children, 140 grandchildren and 140 great-grandchildren.
      From September 21, 1887, to March 21, 1888, he imprisoned in a penal institution for polygamy. Many interesting stories he told of prison life. David Bybee, a relative and dear friend, was in with the criminals and suffered by their vile language. He asked George, who had been more fortunate, to intercede for him to be moved to better quarters. George was successful and he and David shared the same cell and were happy. George did mason work at the pen and was favored with the privilege of eating with the guards, having much better food than the other prisoners. He also cared for some pigs, raising sixteen nice ones for the prison. He asked for two of them when he left and they were given to him. This gave him a nice start of hogs for himself. He was released from prison without paying the usual fine imposed in like cases.
      Compiled by W.L. Wilding, with lots of appreciated help from Clara Wilding **** and her family.


      Men Who Remember Seeing the Prophet Joseph.
      At a meeting of the High Priests' quorum of the Granite Stake of Zion, Dec. 15, the program consisted of short talks by members who had personally known the Prophet Joseph Smith. The following brethren responded: George Wilding, Hunter, who when he was eleven years old, had first seen the Prophet, and had later worked for him two years; Jacob Peart, who, at the age of nine, saw him while speaking in Nauvoo; W. W. Moesser, Hunter ward, who, at nine years of age, and at his mother's home, remembered sitting upon the knees of the Prophet; Henry Horne, Farmers ward, who, at the age of nine, at his father's home, remembered sitting upon the Prophet's knee; Lewis A. Huffaker, Forest Dale, who, when five years old, remembered the trouble in Nauvoo, and having seen the Prophet about that time. He remembered having been kept in the house while a fight was going on, and that a cannon ball took away part of the picket fence; Joseph A. Fisher, Forest Dale, who, at the age of three, so his mother told him, had been held by the Prophet in his arms, and can just remember having heard him preach; Stephen W. Taylor, Waterloo, who, at the age of five, remembered the Prophet as he saw him riding a horse at a soldiers' drill; Edward Morgan, Mill Creek, who, at the age of five, remembered seeing the Prophet dead, and the people weeping and crying over the loss of their leader; also Edward Webb. South Cottonwood. Belonging to the same quorum was Job Smith of Sugar ward, who was confined to his bed with sickness and who has since passed to his reward. He was sixteen years of age when he first saw the Prophet. The meeting was very entertaining to the younger members. Besides the information which was given concerning the Prophet, some very strong testimonies of the divinity of his mission were given by the brethren who spoke.

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