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LEE, Colonel Richard I

LEE, Colonel Richard I

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  • Name LEE, Richard 
    Prefix Colonel 
    Suffix
    Born 22 Mar 1613  Coton Hall, Nordley Regis Manor, Shropshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 22 Mar 1617  Worcester St Martin, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Buried Mar 1664  Lee Family Graveyard, Dividing Creek Plantation, Northumberland, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1 Mar 1664  Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    WAC 5 May 1930  SLAKE Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _TAG Reserved by Others 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I45193  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Father LEE, Richard,   b. 10 Jun 1563, Alveley, Shropshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Oct 1621, Stratford Lanthorne, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years) 
    Mother BENDY, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1579, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Apr 1630, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 51 years) 
    Married 21 Oct 1599  Alveley, Shropshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F22772  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family CONSTABLE, Anne Owen,   b. 21 Feb 1621, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Oct 1666, Chesapeake, Northampton, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years) 
    Married Abt 1640  Jamestown, James City, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. LEE, John,   b. 1643, Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1673, Mt.Pleasant, Westmoreland, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
     2. LEE, Frances,   b. 1645, Dividing Creek Plantation, Kilmarnock, Lancaster, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Nov 1714, Westmoreland, Albemarle, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     3. LEE, Colonel Richard II,   b. 21 May 1647, Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Mar 1714, Machodoc Plantation, Westmoreland, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     4. LEE, Francis,   b. 1648, New Poquoson, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1714, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     5. LEE, Henry,   b. 1650, York, York, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1696, Surry, Surry, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     6. LEE, Captain William Constable,   b. 1651, Charles City, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jul 1696, King and Queen, VIrginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)
    +7. LEE, Captain Hancock,   b. 1652, Northumberland, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1709, Ditchley, Northumberland, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     8. LEE, Anne,   b. 1653, Paradise Plantation, Gloucester, Virginia, British America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1701  (Age 48 years)
     9. LEE, Elizabeth Betsey,   b. 1654, Paradise Plantation, Gloucester, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Mar 1714, Jamestown, Virginia, British Colonial America Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     10. LEE, Anne 2,   b. 1655, Henrico, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1655  (Age 0 years)
     11. LEE, Captain Charles,   b. 21 May 1656, Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jul 1701, Cobbs Hall, Northumberland, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)
     12. LEE, Rachel,   b. 10 Oct 1658, Henrico, Virginia, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. DECEASED
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F22784  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsWAC - 5 May 1930 - SLAKE Link to Google Earth
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  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 
    • Richard Lee, later nicknamed "The Immigrant" was the first member of the Lee family to live in America. Richard Lee was born 22 March 1617 in Shropshire, England, to John Lee. Richard Lee immigrated to Virginia in 1639. Richard Lee was a lawyer, planter, soldier, politician, and member of the Virginia House of Burgess. It is claimed in many genealogies that Richard's wife was Anne Constable, daughter of Francis Constable, the London publisher. During 1663, Richard Lee, with his wife and children traveled to England, where he had his will executed in London on 6 February 1663-4, just before returning alone to Virginia to oversee his interests in the Colony. The exact date of his death is unknown, but it had to be before 20 April 1664 when his son John made an application for land due to his father's being deceased. It is also not known where he died, but it may have been at his home at Dividing Creeks, Northumberland, Virginia. Lee's will stated that his wife and children should return to Virginia "all except Francis if he be pleased." His property in England was to be sold, and the proceeds be used to discharge his debts, to pay for the education of his two eldest sons, John and Richard, and to provide dowries for his daughters, Elizabeth and Anne. Lee left land to all his sons and to his widow Anne for her lifetime. His widow Anne later married Edmund Lister before 24 September 1666. The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Richard Lee at Dividing Creeks.

      There are some researchers who claim that Henry Lee (1650-1696) was a son of Richard, but the Society of the Lees of Virginia do not recognize that claim because of the lack of evidence.

      Birth: unknown
      Death: Jun., 1467


      Family links:
      Parents:
      Richard Of Haddon Vernon (1389 - 1451)
      Benedicta Ludlow Vernon (1396 - 1427)

      Spouse:
      Margaret Swynfen Vernon (____ - 1460)*

      Children:
      Henry Vernon (1447 - 1515)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Inscription:
      Hic jacent Dns Willmus Vernon Miles quondam Constabularius Angliae filius et haeres Domini Ricardi Vernon Militis, qui quondam erat Thesauarius Calesiae qui quidem Dominus Willius obiit ultimo die mensis Junii Anno Dni Millesimo CCCCLXVII. Et Margareta uxor dicti Willmi filia hereditar' dni Roberti Pypis et Spernores Militis : quae quidem Margareta obiit ...... anno Domini millimo CCCCLX. Quorum Animabus Propicietur Deus AMEN.

      [Translation from the Latin:]
      "Here lies Sir William Vernon, Knight, Constable of England, son and heir of Sir Richard Vernon, Knight, who was Treasurer at Calais, the said Sir William died the last day of June in the Year of our Lord 1467. Also Margaret, wife of the said William, daughter and heiress of Sir Robert of Pipe and Spernore, Knight : this Margaret died ... in the Year of our Lord 1460. May God bless their souls. Amen."

      Note: The discrepancy in the identification of his wife's father has caused confusion to genealogists. See her memorial for clarification to her identity.

      Burial:
      St. Bartholomews
      Tong
      Shropshire Unitary Authority
      Shropshire, England

      Created by: Todd Whitesides
      Record added: Jan 09, 2013
      Find A Grave Memorial# 103349296
      Retrieved from: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=103349296

      "COLONEL RICHARD LEE, THE EMIGRANT



      Lee, Richard, who was honored in being the progenitor of the distinguished Lee family of Virginia, was descended from the Coton branch of the Shropshire Lees, one of the oldest families in England, their ancestry being traceable for some 750 years. "Colonel Richard Lee, Secretary of State in Virginia, anno 1659" was described by a descendant as "of good stature, comely visage, an enterprising genius, a sound head, vigorous spirit and generous nature."

      His first home in Virginia was in York county, where on Aug., 10, 1642, he was granted 1,000 acres of land.

      There is a tradition to the effect that Col. Lee was accompanied to Virginia by a brother Robert who also settled in York, but whether or not this is true, or whether the other families of Lee in Virginia were in any way related to the councilor, cannot be proven.

      The first mention of Lee as holding a public place is in the official records under date of Feb., 1641, when he was appointed clerk of the council. On Oct. 12, 1643, he was made attorney general, in 1646, he was a magistrate for York and the year following represented that county in the house of burgesses. He seems to have moved away from York in or before 1651, as in that year he was paid for services as a burgess of Northumberland.

      On Sept. 9, of the same year, he was present in the council as a member. He owned three plantations, one in York county, on the York river, and two in Northumberland on

      Dividing creeks, where necks of land afford such a good harbor that it is used to this day as a landing place for Baltimore steamers.

      In addition to these places grants of land in Lancaster, Westmoreland and Gloucester were made to him. He was a staunch Royalist and made many trips to England and on to Holland, the latter for the express purpose of seeing the exiled King, Charles II.

      According to John Gibbons, Lee intended to end his days in England, and with this in view, employed him, Gibbons, to oversee his estate in the colony.

      It happens however, that his will arranges for the disposal of his English property and the settlement of his children in the colony, "all except Francis if he be pleased," so that is seems probable that Gibbons was in error.

      This will was executed in London on Feb. 6, 1663-4, while Col. Lee was in England. He must have returned to Virginia shortly after this and died almost upon arrival, as he is mentioned under date of April 20, 1664, as "Colonel Richard Lee Esq., who is now deceased".

      Reference: Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography page 116-7


      "Richard Lee, The Emigrant

      1613 (?)- 1644

      The Richard Lee with whom we are concerned was the emigrant ancestor of such distinguished Virginians as Thomas Lee of Stratford, Richard Henry Lee and "Lighthorse Harry" Lee of Revolutionary fame, President Zachary Taylor, and Robert Edward Lee. The basic work on this family is Lee of Virginia by Edmund Jennings Lee (Philadelphia, 1895). In The Lees of Virginia (Boston, 1935) Burton J. Hendrick has presented a "biography of a family." 1 Neither of these works, however, affords a satisfactory account of the Emigrant's English origin or of his career in its historical context. 2

      In 1895 Edmund Jennings Lee could present only inconclusive evidence of Richard Lee's descent from the Lees of Coton in Shropshire, a list of his public offices in Virginia, a contemporary account of his mission to Charles II at Breda, and transcripts of his land grants and his will. Forty years later Hendrick, with no better information, made no attempt to construct a narrative of the Emigrant's career, but rather sought to interpret his character. In doing so Hendrick drew largely on the general social history of the period and on his own imagination.

      Now, however, it is possible to write with assurance regarding Richard Lee's parentage and to trace his career after 1640 in some circumstantial detail. This difference is attributable in part to research conducted in England by Mr. Edward Forrest (1926-1928) and Colonel William LeHardy (1939, 1949-1951),3 and in part to further research in Virginia made feasible by the publication of Dr. Swem's Index and Mrs. Nugent's Cavaliers and Pioneers.

      Regrettably, many questions relating to the Emigrant remain answerable only in speculative terms. It appears, however, that no further information will be forthcoming except by lucky accident. It therefore seems appropriate to present a comprehensive account of Richard Lee's origin and career on the basis of information now available.

      The Lees of Shropshire

      The name Lee is manifestly of Saxon origin. 4 For that reason it has been mistakenly supposed that the lees came into Shropshire with the Saxons. Actually they were of Norman origin, their English surname being derived from their original estate, the manor of the lee under Pimhill.

      The earliest provable ancestor of the Lees of Shropshire was the Norman Reyner de Lega (or de Le') who flourished about the year 1200. He appears to have been the first to bear the generic Lee arms: gules, a fess chequy or and azure between ten billets argent, four in chief and three, two, one in base. 5

      Through successive generations the descendants of Reyner de Lega prospered, achieving knighthoods, marrying well, acquiring additional manors. In the sixth generation two sons of the house, both named Roger, married two notable heiresses. Roger, the son of John Lee of Lee and Pimhill, married Johanna Burnell of Acton Burnell and Langley. Roger, the son of Sir John Lee of Roden and Stanton, married Margaret Astley of Coton and Nordley Regis.

      Roger Lee and Johanna Burnell had an only daughter, Petronella, who married her cousin Robert, the elder son of Roger Lee and Margaret Astley. This marriage united all the Lee estates in Shropshire except Coton and Nordley Regis, which passed to Robert's younger brother John. From Robert were descended the Lees of Langley, from John those of Coton. By 1569 those two families were the only ones known to the Heralds as entitled to bear the arms of Reyner de Lega.6

      Coton and Nordley Regis

      Coton Hall, in the manor of Nordley Regis and the parish of Alveley, at the southeastern extremity of Shropshire, is no ordinary English country house. The site, a high hill overlooking the Severn Valley, has been of special local importance since Roman times. 7

      In last Saxon times the height of Coton was the site of a collegiate church probably founded by Bishop Oswald of Worcester (960-9920. The earliest document relating to the place is a deed of 1058 whereby Bishop Eldred of Worcester granted to Canon Dodda life tenure of Northtun, the manor pertaining to this ecclesiastical foundation. 8

      At the time of the Norman Conquest the manors of Alveley and Nordley, surrounding Coton, were held by Edwin, the last Saxon Earl of Mercia. (This manor of Nordley was identical with the Northtun of the deed of 1058). After Edwin's defeat and death in 1069 King William gave Alveley and Nordley to Roger de Montgomery, the Earl Palatine of the Welsh frontier. Earl Roger and his successor, Robert de Belesme, dispersed the college at Cotton, established a new parish church at Alveley, and gave the ecclesiastical endowment of the parish to support a new collegiate church at Bridgnorth.

      In 1102 King Henry I seized the lands of Robert de Belesme (who had resisted his succession to the throne) and took Alveley and Nordley into the royal demesne. Despite the removal of its collegiate church, Coton had continued to be a distinct administrative center.

      The King maintained a garrison there at the Portway Gate (apparently a toll house on the highway from Worcester to Bridgnorth). A common manorial court for both Alveley and Nordley was held at Coton, which was also the seat from which the chief prebend of Bridgnorth administered his endowment in the parish.

      The captain of the King's guard at Coton was one, Fitz Ulky, to whom Henry I granted the vill of Astley (east ley) within the manor of Nordley Regis. Fitz Ulky's descendants adopted the surname de Astley and in time came to hold both Astley and Nordley Regis as separate manors, with their seat at Coton. Eventually the manor of Astley passed to a son-in-law, but Coton and Nordley Regis remained to become in 1376 the inheritance of that Margaret Astley who married Roger Lee. 9


      In the time of Queen Elizabeth, Humphrey Lee, fourth in descent from Roger Lee and Margaret Astley, rebuilt the mansion house at Coton. In doing so he not only filled in the moat, but also raised up a terrace which completely concealed the ground floor of the medieval structure. His mansion showed three stories above ground. Built in the shape of a reversed "L." it measured 51 feet in length on the west side, 83 feet across the south front, 97 feet along the east side, and 42 feet on the north. This building remained substantially unchanged until 1812, when Harry Lancelot Lee removed the third story and built in the open sides of the "L" to form a quadrangle. 10

      Humphrey Lee's only son, John was born in 1530 and succeeded to the manor of Nordley Regis in 1588. John Lee married Joyce Romney in 1553 and had eight sons: Thoms, William, Edward, Gilbert, Jasper, Richard, Ferdinand, and Josias. Richard Lee, born in 1563, was the father of Richard Lee, the emigrant to Virginia.


      The Emigrant's Parentage

      The problem of Richard Lee's parentage has long baffled genealogists. In recent years, however, information has been brought to light which permits older evidence to be interpreted with new assurance.

      Richard Lee was unquestionably descended from the ancient Shropshire family of that name, for he used the generic arms of Lee of Shropshire, and a contemporary officer of the College of Arms attested his right to do so. 11

      It has been argued that, using those arms without quarterings, he might.."

      Ref: The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 62 January 1954 No.1 by Ludwell Lee Montague pages 1-6 of pages 1-49.


      Richard Lee I
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

      Col. Richard Lee I (1618–1664), the "Immigrant"
      Colonel Richard Lee I (1617–1664), later nicknamed "The Immigrant" was the first member of the Lee family to live in America; he emigrated from Shropshire, England to Virginia in 1639. Lee was a lawyer, planter and member of the Virginia House of Burgesses.

      By the time of his death, Lee was the largest landholder in Virginia, with 13,000 acres and perhaps the richest man in Virginia.

      He was the great-great-great grandfather of Confederate general Robert E. Lee and the great-grandfather of President Zachary Taylor.

      Contents [hide]
      1Biography
      1.1Colonial politics
      1.2Land holdings
      1.3Death
      1.4Richard Lee's marriage
      2Children
      3Family legacy
      4References
      5Further reading
      Biography[edit]
      Lee arrived in Jamestown at the age of 22 with very little to his name other than the patronage of an influential man, Sir Francis Wyatt, the 1st Governor of Virginia and the great grandson of the poet, Sir Thomas Wyatt, whose brother-in-law Anthony Lee was Richard Lee's ancestor. Once there he became Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, Colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council.

      In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606–1677), on the recommendation of Sir Francis Wyatt, appointed Lee as Attorney General of the Colony.[1]

      Lee became Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State's office. He was a loyal supporter of King Charles I of England, and his public offices ceased when Oliver Cromwell seized power in England in 1649. In addition, he served as High Sheriff and was a Colonel in the Militia.

      He also became a tobacco planter, trader, an owner and trader of slaves, and an employer and importer of English indentured servants (i.e. employees who paid for their passage to America with seven years of labor).

      Lee was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Lee took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on 10 August 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Lee's first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall's Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on 18 April 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result, the English abandoned the north side of the river.

      He and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres (360,000 m2) and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown.

      On 20 August 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called "War Captain's Neck" and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2).

      Colonial politics[edit]
      Lee became a Burgess of York County from 1647–1651, and in 1649 he was appointed a member of the King's Council, and a Justice and also became Colonial Secretary of State. With the title of Secretary of State, he was next in authority to the Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606–1677). That same year, Charles I, King of England (1600–1649), was beheaded and Oliver Cromwell (1599–1658) began his control. Since the people in the distant colonies could not believe the incredible news from England, they remained loyal to the Crown and to Charles II (1630–1685), heir to the throne. In 1650, Lee made a voyage to the Netherlands to report Virginia's loyal adherence to Charles II. It turns out that two years later, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England, and was satisfied with the terms that were laid out. At this time, he retired from public office, but continued to represent the interests of Virginia in London.

      Land holdings[edit]
      Lee began to acquire many land grants on the peninsula between the York and the Rappahannock River. After peace with the Indians had been concluded and the lands north of the York reopened for settlement in 1649, Lee was issued a patent of 500 acres (2 km²) on 24 May 1651, on land adjacent to “War Captain's Neck”. That same year he also acquired an additional 500 acres (2 km²) on Poropotank Creek. He sold 150 acres (0.6 km2) of his original grant, the tract on Poropotank Creek. This left 850 acres (3.4 km2) at the original site, to which he later gave the name "Paradise", and resided from 1653–1656 in the newly created Gloucester County. He became a part owner of a trading ship, whose cargoes brought indentured servants with headrights that Lee used to enlarge his Virginia property. He spent nearly as much of his time from 1652 to his death in 1664, in London, as he did in Virginia. In about 1656 Lee moved the family to Virginia's Northern Neck, the peninsula formed by the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. Leaving the "Paradise" tract to overseers, they resettled on a spot acquired from the Wicomico Indians, which consisted of 1,900 acres (8 km2). This new land was termed "Dividing Creek", near what is today the town of Kilmarnock. This tract in later generations became known as that of “Cobbs Hall”.

      He later purchased another 2,600 acres (11 km2) in Northumberland County at Machodoc Creek, which empties into the Potomac River. This tract was patented on 18 October 1657, and repatented the following year on 5 June 1658 as 2,000 acres (8 km²). Upon this tract became what was known in later generations as the estates "Mount Pleasant" and "Lee Hall". He then acquired 4,000 acres (16 km²) farther up the Potomac, near where the city of Washington, D.C., would rise, in what was then Westmoreland, now Fairfax County. One of these would eventually become the site of Mount Vernon.

      Disposing of several lesser properties he had obtained, Lee was able to consolidate and develop four major plantations. He had two in Gloucester County: "War Captain's Neck" and "Paradise", and two in Northumberland County: "Dividing Creek" and "Machodoc". He also acquired a plantation called "Lee's Purchase", located across the Potomac in Maryland.

      In 1658 Lee acquired a residence at Stratford Langthorne, in the County of Essex, then a pleasant suburb of London, and in 1661 he moved his family there. Essex borders London on the east, and the village of Stratford Langthorne was a resort for persons of means who found London unhealthy. It is located about a mile from Stratford-at-Bow on the north side of the Thames in West Ham Parish, until recently the site of great wharves, docks, and the congestion of east London. He did that so that his younger children would have a proper education, seeing as his oldest two sons, John and Richard Lee II, were already students at Oxford. Nevertheless, he eventually wanted his children to reside in Virginia. Though now a resident of England, he continued in his role as a Virginia planter and merchant.

      Death[edit]
      During 1663, Richard Lee, with his wife and children, journeyed to England, where he had his will executed in London on 6 February 1663-4 just before returning alone to Virginia to oversee his interests in the Colony. The exact date of his death is unknown, but had to be before 20 April 1664 when his son John made an application for land due to his father, deceased. (John had probably returned to Virginia with his father.) It is also not known where he died, but it may have been at his home at "Dividing Creeks", Northumberland Co., Virginia.[2][3]

      Lee’s will directed that his wife and children, "all except Francis if he be pleased", were to return to Virginia. His property at Stratford in England was to be sold, and the proceeds be used to discharge his debts, to pay for the education of his two eldest sons, John and Richard, and to provide dowries for his daughters, Elizabeth and Anne. Lee left land to all his sons and to his widow Anne for her lifetime. In Virginia, he left the "Dividing Creeks" and "Mocke Nock" plantations to his widow for her lifetime, and afterwards to be divided among his three youngest sons, the "Machodoc" plantation and three islands in the bay of Chesapeake to his son John, the "Paradise" plantation to Richard II, and "Paper-makers Neck" and "War Captain's Neck" to Francis, to William "all the land on the Maryland side, and the remaining plantations and land to William and his two youngest sons, Hancock and Charles. Lee had also been actively involved in the slave trade[1] and he left his widow 5 "negro" slaves for "during her widowhood and no longer" and 10 English (indentured) servants. He gave John 10 "negro" slaves as well as 10 English (indentured) servants. He left to Richard II the indentures (contracts) of English servants (i.e. employees) on the "Paradise" plantation, and Francis received five "negro" slaves and the indentures of 10 English servants. Other property that was divided among his 8 surviving children included livestock and furniture. His share in 2 trading ships he left to Francis.[3]

      His widow Anna (or Anne) married again to Edmund Lister before 24 September 1666.[3] The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Lee near the house at "Dividing Creeks".

      Richard Lee's marriage[edit]
      It is claimed in many genealogies that Richard's wife was Anne[4] Constable, the daughter of Francis Constable, the London publisher.[5]

      Children[edit]
      Richard I Lee and his wife Ann had 10 children

      John Lee (1643–1673) of "Mount Pleasant", who never married
      Henry Lee (1650–1696) The Society of the Lees of Virginia do not recognize this son.[6]
      Col. Richard Lee II "the scholar" (1647–1715), who married Laetitia Corbin (c.1657–1706), daughter of Hon. Henry Corbin, Sr (1629–1676) and Alice (Eltonhead) Burnham (c.1627–1684). Great-Great-grandfather of General Robert E. Lee
      Francis Lee (1648–1714) a merchant in England, who married Tamar
      Capt. William Lee (1651–1696), who married Alice Felton in 1675 and fathered four children
      Capt. Hancock Lee I, Hon. (1653–1709) of "Ditchley", who married 1) Mary Kendall (1661–1694); 2) Sarah Elizabeth Allerton (1671–1731), daughter of Col. Isaac Allerton, Jr. (1630–1702) (son of Isaac Allerton of the Mayflower) and his second wife, Elizabeth (Willoughby) Grandfather of President Zachary Taylor
      Elizabeth (Betsey) Lee (1654–1714), who married 1) Leonard Howson Sr (1648–1704); 2) John Turberville (1650–1728), son of George Turberville IV (1638-c.1659) and Bridget
      Anne Lee (1654–1701), who married Maj. Thomas Youell Jr (1644–1695), son of Thomas Youell (1615–1655) and Anne Sturman (d. 1672)
      Capt. Charles Lee Sr (1655–1701) of "Cobbs Hall", who married Elizabeth Medstand, daughter of Thomas Medstand (−1675). Ancestor of the Manning family of Eli Manning and Peyton Manning[citation needed]
      Anne Lee (1655), who died young
      Family legacy[edit]
      Today the different branches of the Lee family are known as: "Cobb's Hall", "Mount Pleasant", "Ditchley", "Lee Hall", “Blenheim”, "Leesylvania", "Dividing Creek", and "Stratford". These were the estate names of the descendants of Richard Lee I that are still referred to today when talking of Lee descendancy. An interesting note is that Lee had patented somewhere in the neighbourhood of 15,000 acres (61 km²) on both sides of the Potomac, in Maryland and in Virginia. Part of this land later became George Washington’s Mount Vernon. When he divided his estate among his children, he also left them the products of the several plantations including white indentured servants, Negro slaves, livestock, household furnishings, silver, and many other luxuries.

      Notable descendants of Richard Lee I include signers of the Declaration of Independence Francis Lightfoot Lee and Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary War general Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, Confederate Civil War generals Robert E. Lee, Richard Taylor, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, Stephen D. Lee, and George Washington Custis Lee, Richard L. T. Beale, Richard Lucian Page; President of the United States Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice of the United States Edward Douglass White, Governor of Maryland Thomas Sim Lee and US Senator Wilkinson Call.

      References[edit]
      ^ Jump up to: a b McGaughy, J.K., Richard Henry Lee of Virginia: a portrait of an American revolutionary
      Jump up ^ Hannings, B., American Revolutionary War leaders: a biographical dictionary
      ^ Jump up to: a b c Lee, E.J., Lee of Virginia, 1642–1892: Biographical and Genealogical Sketches of the descendants of Colonel Richard Lee
      Jump up ^ Her name is given as Anna in Richard Lee's will, and Anne in documentation of 24 September 1666
      Jump up ^ Genealogy Magazine
      Jump up ^ http://www.thesocietyoftheleesofva.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4&Itemid=543
      Further reading[edit]
      McGaughy, J.K., Richard Henry Lee of Virginia: a portrait of an American revolutionary Chapter 1 [1]

      Lee, Casenove, Lee Chronicle, published by New York University Press, New York, NY, in 1957.