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NAVARRE, Princess Jeanne

NAVARRE, Princess Jeanne

Female 1272 - 1305  (33 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name NAVARRE, Jeanne 
    Prefix Princess 
    Born 4 Jan 1272  Bar-sur-Seine, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Buried Apr 1305  Couvent Des Cordeliers, Paris, City Of Paris, Ile-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 2 Apr 1305  Vincennes, Val-de-Marne, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I45321  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Father NAVARRE, Enrique Henri,   b. Abt 1244, Troyes, Aube, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jul 1274, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years) 
    Mother ARTIOS, Queen Blanche d',   b. 1248, Arras, Hautes-Pyrénées, Midi-Pyrénées, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 May 1302, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 1269 
    Family ID F23735  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family FRANCE, King Philippe IV,   b. 28 May 1268, Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1314, Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years) 
    Married 16 Aug 1284  Notre Dame, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. FRANCE, Princess Marguerite,   b. Abt 1286, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1294  (Age ~ 9 years)
     2. FRANCE, Louis X,   b. 4 Oct 1289, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jun 1316, Vincennes, Val-de-Marne, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years)
     3. FRANCE, Blanche,   b. 1290, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 13 Apr 1294  (Age > 4 years)
     4. FRANCE, King Philippe VI,   b. 17 Nov 1293, Lyon, Rhone-Alpes, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1350, Nogent-le-Roi, Eure-et-Loir, Centre-Val de Loire, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     5. CAPET, Charles IV,   b. 18 Jun 1294, Clermont, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1328, Vincennes, Val-de-Marne, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
     6. FRANCE, Robert,   b. 1297, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aug 1308  (Age 11 years)
    +7. CAPET, Princess Isabel,   b. 22 Mar 1292, Orleans, Bourgogne, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1358, Hertford Castle, Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F16677  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 Aug 1284 - Notre Dame, Paris, Seine, France Link to Google Earth
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  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 
    • Joan I of Navarre was born 14 January 1273 and died 2 April 1305. She was queen regnant of Navarre and ruling countess of Champagne from 1274 until 1305; she was also queen consort of France by marriage to Philip IV of France. She was the daughter of king Henry I of Navarre and Blanche of Artois.
      Queen of Navarre; Countess of Champagne
      Reign1274–1305
      PredecessorHenry I
      SuccessorLouis I
      Queen consort of France
      Reign1285–1305
      Born14 January 1273
      Bar-sur-Seine, France
      Died 2 April 1305 (aged 32)
      Château de Vincennes, France
      Spouse Philip IV of France
      Louis X of France
      Philip V of France
      Charles IV of France
      Isabella, Queen of England
      House Blois
      Father Henry I of Navarre
      Mother Blanche of Artois
      Religion Roman Catholicism

      Life

      Joan was born in Bar-sur-Seine, Champagne on 14 January 1273 as a princess of the House of Blois. The following year, upon the death of her father, she became Countess of Champagne and queen regnant of Navarre. Her mother, Blanche, was her guardian and regent in Navarre. Various powers, both foreign and Navarrese, sought to take advantage of the minority of the heiress and the "weakness" of the female regent, which caused Joan and her mother to seek protection at the court of Philip III of France. Her mother arrived in France in 1274, and by the Treaty of Orléans in 1275, Joan was betrothed to one of Philip's sons (Louis or Philip). Blanche therefore placed her daughter and the government of Navarre under the protection of the King of France. After this, Joan was brought up with Philip. It is, in fact, uncertain whether she ever resided in Navarre during her childhood.

      Queen of France

      At the age of 11, Joan married the future Philip IV of France on 16 August 1284, becoming queen consort of France in 1285 a year later. Their three surviving sons would all rule as kings of France, in turn, and their only surviving daughter, Isabella became queen consort of England.

      Joan was described as having been plump and plain, whereas her beautiful daughter Isabella resembled her father more in physical appearance. As regards her character, Joan was bold, courageous, and enterprising.

      Joan was described as a success in her role of Queen of France: she secured the succession, she was an efficient mistress of the royal court, a dignified first lady and had a very good relationship with the King. Having grown up together, the couple was evidently close to each other and Philip is reported to have loved and respected her deeply.[5] His emotional dependence on her is suggested as a reason to why she never visited Navarre. In 1294, Philip appointed her regent of France should his son succeed him being still a minor.[6] However, he is not believed to have entrusted her with influence over the affairs of France, unless they concerned her own domains Navarre and Champagne.[6]

      Queen Joan founded the famous College of Navarre in Paris in 1305.[citation needed]

      Queen of Navarre and Countess of Champagne

      Queen Joan I of Navarre and countess of Champagne and Brie was declared to be of legal majority upon her marriage in 1284, and did homage for Champagne and Brie to her father-in-law in Paris.[7]

      Joan never visited the Kingdom of Navarre, which was ruled in her name by French governors appointed first by her father-in-law and then by her spouse in her name.[2] The French governors were extremely unpopular in Navarre and her absence from the country was resented:[8] however, it was the French who were blamed for her absence rather than her, and the loyalty to her right to rule was not questioned; rather, it was emphasized in Navarre that it was in fact she rather than the French who was their sovereign. From afar, edicts were issued in her name, coins struck in her image,[8] and she gave her protection to chapels and convents. She never came closer to Navarre than to Carcasonne in 1300, and her spouse was somewhat blamed for this.[5]

      Joan was much more directly active as countess of Champagne. While being a county rather than a kingdom, Champagne was much richer and more strategically important. Philip IV appointed her administrators, however, Joan visited Champagne regularly and is recorded to have participated in all duties of a ruling vassal and is not regarded to have been passive but an active independent ruler in this domain. In 1297, she raised and led an army against the Count of Bar when he rebelled against her by invading Champagne.[9] This was explicitly in the absence of her spouse, and she personally brought the count to prison before she joined her spouse.[9] She also personally acted in her process against Bishop Guichard of Troyes, whom she accused of having stolen funds from Champagne and her mother by fraud.

      Joan died in 1305, allegedly in childbirth, though one chronicler accused her husband of having killed her. Her personal physician was the inventor Guido da Vigevano.

      With Philip IV of France:

      Margaret (1288 – c. 1294)
      Louis X of France, King Louis I of Navarre from 1305, France from 1314 (October 1289 – 5 June 1316)
      Blanche (1290 – c. 1294)
      Philip V of France and Navarre (as Philip II) (1292/93 – 3 January 1322)
      Charles IV of France and Navarre (as Charles I) (c. 1294 – 1 February 1328)
      Isabella (c. 1295 – 23 August 1358), married Edward II of England
      Robert (1297 – July 1308)

      Jeanne Ire de Navarre (née le 14 janvier 1273 à Bar-sur-Seine, Champagne - morte le 2 avril 1305 à Vincennes, France), princesse de la maison de Champagne, fut reine de Navarre de 1274 à 1305 et reine de France de 1285 à 1305.

      Mariage

      Jeanne Ire était la fille du roi Henri Ier de Navarre et de Blanche d'Artois, de lignée capétienne.

      Elle épousa, le 16 août 1284, à l'âge de 11 ans, l'héritier de la couronne de France, Philippe, qui devint ainsi roi de Navarre sous le nom de Philippe Ier (1284-1305). En 1285, son époux devint roi de France sous le nom de Philippe IV le Bel. Elle lui donna six enfants, dont une fille, Isabelle, qui devint reine consort d'Angleterre et trois fils, tous devenus rois de France.

      Malgré son mariage, elle continua de régner seule sur ses domaines. Elle est à l'origine de la création du collège de Navarre et de l'hôtel-Dieu de Château-Thierry.

      Acte de fondation du collège de Navarre à Paris, donné à Vincennes le 25 mars 1305 par Jeanne, reine de France et de Navarre, épouse de Philippe le Bel. Une petite charte est jointe À l’acte de fondation. Archives nationales AE/II/308a et AE/II/308b

      Descendance

      De son mariage avec Philippe le Bel sont issus six enfants, dont :

      Louis X le Hutin (1289-1316), roi de France et également roi Louis Ier de Navarre (1314-1316).
      Isabelle (1292-1358), épouse du roi d'Angleterre Édouard II.
      Philippe V le Long (1293-1322), roi de France et également roi Philippe II de Navarre (1316-1322).
      Charles IV le Bel (1294-1328), roi de France et également roi Charles Ier de Navarre (1322-1328).

      Mort

      Trois ans après la mort de sa mère, Blanche d'Artois, elle meurt subitement elle aussi. À l'époque, la mort de Jeanne et de sa mère parurent suspectes. En 1308, une enquête fut ouverte et on arrêta un homme, l'évêque Guichard de Troyes, dont Blanche avait délaissé les services. Lors de son procès, Guichard s'était vanté de les avoir fait mourir avec l'aide d'une sorcière et d'un moine jacobin.

      Testament

      Sceau de Jeanne Ire de Navarre.

      Peu de temps avant sa mort, le jour de l'Annonciation 1304 (25 mars), elle fait rédiger son testament au château de Vincennes. Ce document comprend deux volets : le premier consacré à la création d'un collège au sein de son hôtel particulier parisien, l'hôtel de Navarre, le second fonde un hôtel-Dieu pour l'accueil et le soin des membres souffrants du Christ à Château-Thierry. Le collège conçu sur le modèle de celui fondé par Robert de Sorbon connait la postérité en tant que collège de Navarre. L'hôtel-Dieu quant à lui voit le jour quelques années plus tard. Aujourd'hui transformé en musée, il est à l'origine de l'hôpital de la ville.