JosephSmithSr.
So shall it be with my father: he shall be
called a prince over his posterity, holding
the keys of the patriarchal priesthood over the kingdom of God on earth, even the Church
of the Latter Day Saints, and he shall sit in the general assembly of patriarchs, even in
council with the Ancient of Days when he shall sit and all the patriarchs with him and shall
enjoy his right and authority under the direction of the Ancient of Days.
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NAPLES, King Carlo

NAPLES, King Carlo

Male 1254 - 1309  (54 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name NAPLES, Carlo 
    Prefix King 
    Born 24 Jul 1254  Napoli, Napoli, Campania, Italie Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _TAG Temple 
    Died 13 May 1309  Cassanova, Naples, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 14 May 1309  Naples, Napoli, Campania, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I45456  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith
    Last Modified 19 Aug 2021 

    Father SICILY, King Carlo,   b. 21 Mar 1227, of Anjou, Paris, Seine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jan 1285, Foggia, Apulia, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Mother PROVENCE, Queen Beatrice de,   b. 1234, Aix en Provence, Bouches-du-Rhone, Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Sep 1267, Nocera Superiore, Salerno, Campania, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years) 
    Married 31 Jan 1246 
    Family ID F23828  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family HUNGARY, Princess Maria,   b. Abt 1255, Budapest, Pest, Hungary Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Mar 1323, Napoli, Campania, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Married 1270 
    Children 
    +1. COURTENAY, Countess Catherine de,   b. 25 Nov 1274, Courtenay, Loiret, Centre, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Dec 1299, St. Jacques, Paris, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
     2. NAPLES, Queen Bianca,   b. Abt 1280, Napoli, Napoli, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Oct 1310, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years)
     3. NAPLES, Queen Eleanora,   b. Aug 1289, Napoli, Napoli, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1341, D'arene, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 51 years)
     4. SICILY, Princess Maria,   b. Abt 1290, Napoli, Napoli, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1346, Campania, Naples, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 56 years)
     5. HUNGARY, King Karoly,   b. Sep 1291, Napoli, Napoli, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Aug 1295, Napoli, Napoli, Italy Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 3 years)
    Last Modified 24 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F23761  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 
    • Charles II, called the Lame (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples, King of Albania, Prince of Salerno, Prince of Achaea, Count of Provence and Forcalquier and Count of Anjou.
      He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.
      During the Sicilian Vespers, he was captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.
      In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was freed on condition that he retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.
      Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages. He promised to pay 30,000 marks and to return as a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years.[1] He then went to Rieti, where the new pope, Nicholas IV, absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.
      Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother, Frederick.
      Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the Pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.
      An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea, but Charles, though aided by the Pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the Battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Eleanor and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the Pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.
      He died in Naples in May 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.
      Family
      In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:
      Charles Martel of Anjou, titular King of Hungary
      Margaret (1273– 31 December 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil 16 August 1290 to Charles of Valois
      Saint Louis of Toulouse (9 February 1274, Nocera Inferiore – 19 August 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse
      Robert the Wise, King of Naples
      Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople
      Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran 1 November 1295 James II of Aragon
      Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria
      John (1283 – aft. 16 March 1308), a priest
      Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)
      Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – 9 August 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina 17 May 1302 Frederick III of Sicily
      Maria of Naples (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca 20 September 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)
      Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina
      John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293–1336), married 14 November 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)
      Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)
      References
      1. Wikisource-logo.svg Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Charles II. (King of Naples)". Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 923–924.
      2. Steven Runciman, The Sicilian Vespers, (Cambridge University Press, 2000), 138.
      3. a b c d e f g h Ronald G. Musto, Apocalypse in Rome: Cola di Rienzo and the Politics of the New Age, (University of California, 2003), 78.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Life Sketch
      He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.
      During the Sicilian Vespers, he was captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.
      In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was freed on condition that he retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.
      Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages. He promised to pay 30,000 marks and to return as a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He then went to Rieti, where the new pope, Nicholas IV, absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.
      Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother, Frederick.
      Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the Pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.
      An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea, but Charles, though aided by the Pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the Battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Eleanor and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the Pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.
      He died in Naples in May 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

      BIO: King of Naples, Sicily, Anjou and Jerusalem; Prince of Salerne.

      ** from http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SICILY.htm#CharlesIdied1285, as of 10/30/2014
      CHARLES d’Anjou Sicily, son of CHARLES de France Comte d'Anjou, CHARLES I King of Sicily, & his first wife Béatrice Ctss de Provence et de Forcalquier ([1254]-Palace of Poggioreale 6 May 1309, bur Naples Dominican church, transferred by order of his son King Roberto I to Aix-en-Provence, Convent Notre-Dame de Nazareth, and again to église de Saint-Barthélemi Aix-en-Provence). The Historia Sicula of Bartolomeo di Neocastro names "secundus dominus Karolus, dominus Philippus" as the sons of "dominus Karolus" and his first wife[778]. The testament of "Beatrix…Regina Sicilie, Ducatus Apuliæ et Principatus Capuæ, Andegavensis, Provinciæ et Forcalquerii Comitissa" is dated "die Mercurii in crastino Beatorum Peteri et Pauli Apostolorum" in 1266, with bequests to "…Carolus filius noster primogenitus…" whom she designated as heir to Provence[779]. He was created Principe di Salerno and Conte di Lesina by his father. He governed the kingdom (with the title Captain and Vicar-General) during his father’s absences in Rome 25 Feb 1271, from end Mar 1272 until beginning Jun 1272, from 3 Mar 1276 to Mar 1277, and finally after his father retired to Bordeaux 12 Jan 1283. Angevin forces were defeated by Aragon, under the leadership of Admiral Doria, in the bay of Naples 5 Jun 1284, during which he was captured. He was imprisoned in Sicily, later in Barcelona, by the king of Aragon[780]. He succeeded his father as CHARLES II "le Boiteux" King of Naples, titular King of Jerusalem, while he was still in captivity. The Pope exercised authority in the kingdom during Charles II’s continuing imprisonment, through Governors Cardinal Gerald of Parma (appointed 16 Feb 1285 by Pope Martin IV) and Robert Comte d’Artois (appointed as an additional governor by Pope Honorius IV). He was released 8 Nov 1288, in return for leaving three of his sons as hostages in Barcelona. Pope Nicholas IV ordered him to assume the title King of Sicily, crowning him as such 29 May 1289 at Rieti cathedral. He returned to Naples 3 Jul 1289 to start his reign. He signed several treaties of peace with Aragon aimed at retaking the throne of Sicily, culminating in the Treaty of Caltabellotta 31 Aug 1302 under which he granted Sicily as dowry to his daughter Eléonore to be ruled for his life by her future husband Federigo de Aragón[781]. The Flores historiarum of Bernard Guidonis records the death 5 May 1309 of "Karolus II rex Siciliæ comesque Provinciæ, filius quondam primi Karoli regis Siciliæ"[782]. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death 5 May 1309 of "Re Carlo II"[783].

      m (Naples [May/Jun] 1270) MÁRIA of Hungary, daughter of ISTVÁN V King of Hungary & Elisabeth [née ---] of the Kumans ([1257]-25 Mar 1324, bur Naples, Santa Maria Donna Regina). The Chronicon Dubnicense records that "rex Stephanus quintus filius Bele regis…[filiam] Maria" married "Karolo claudo fiilio Karoli magni"[784]. She claimed the throne of Hungary 21 Sep 1290, following the death of her brother King Laszlo IV. She was crowned Queen by a Papal legate in Naples 1291, but transferred her rights to her son Charles Martel. The Pope confirmed her sole rights in Hungary 30 Aug 1295. The Annales Ludovici di Raimo record the death "Venerdi Santo...25 di Marzo" in 1324 of "la Regina Maria moglie del Re Carlo II, madre di Re Roberto"[785].

      Mistress (1): ---. The name of Charles's mistress is not known.

      King Charles II & his wife had fourteen children:
      1. CHARLES MARTEL of Sicily (early Sep 1271-Naples from the plague 12 Aug 1295, bur Naples, Cathedral of San Gennaro).
      2. MARGUERITE of Sicily ([1273]-31 Dec 1299, bur Paris, église des Jacobins). m (contract 28 Dec 1289, Corbeil, Essonne 16 Aug 1290) as his first wife, CHARLES de France Comte de Valois et d’Alençon, son of PHILIPPE III “le Hardi” King of France & his first wife Infanta doña Isabel de Aragón (Vincennes 12 Mar 1270-Le Perray, Yvelines 16 Dec 1325, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).
      3. LOUIS of Sicily (Castle of Nocera de’ Pagani Feb 1275-Château de Brignoles, Var 19 Aug 1298, bur Château de Brignoles, transferred 8 Nov 1319 to Marseille, église des Cordeliers, most of his relics were taken by Alfonso V King of Aragon to the Cathedral of Valencia).
      4. ROBERT of Sicily (Royal Palace of the Torre de San Erasmo, near Capua 1278-Château-Neuf, Naples 16/20 Jan 1344, bur Naples Santa Chiara) He succeeded his father in 1309 as ROBERT I "le Bon" King of Sicily.
      5. PHILIPPE of Sicily ([1278]-Naples 26 Dec 1332). He was created Principe di Taranto at Aix-en-Provence 4 Feb 1294. He became Prince of Achaia in 1307. Titular Emperor of Constantinople 1313, by right of his second wife.
      6. BLANCHE of Sicily ([1280]-Barcelona 14 Oct 1310, bur Santa Croce). m (Vilabertran, Catalonia 1 Nov 1295) as his second wife, don JAIME II King of Aragon, son of don PEDRO III King of Aragon & his wife Constanza of Sicily [Hohenstaufen] (Valencia 10 Aug 1267-Barcelona 5 Nov 1327, bur Barcelona church of San Francisco, transferred to Monastery of Santa Cruz, prov Tarragona).
      7. RAYMOND BERENGER of Sicily ([1281]-Oct 1305, bur Naples, San Lorenzo Maggiore). Betrothed (1303) to MARGUERITE de Clermont, daughter of ROBERT de France Comte de Clermont & his wife Béatrix Dame de Bourbon (1289-Paris Jan 1309, bur Paris, église des Jacobins).
      8. JEAN of Sicily (1283-after 16 Mar 1308). Priest.
      9. TRISTAN of Sicily (1284-[1284/88]). Principe di Salerno.
      10. ELEONORE of Sicily (1289-Monastery of San Nicolo di Arena 9 Aug 1341, bur Catania, Franciscan monastery). m firstly (1299, dissolved by Papal bull 17 Jan 1300 because of the minority of the parties) PHILIPPE de Toucy titular Prince of Antioch, Signor di Terza, son of NARJOT de Toucy Signor di Terza in Apulia & his wife Lucia of Antioch ex-Ctss of Tripoli (-after 1300). m secondly (Messina May 1303) FEDERIGO I King of Trinacria [Sicily], son of PEDRO III King of Aragon & his wife Constanza of Sicily [Hohenstaufen] (1272-near Pamplona 25 Jun 1337).
      11. MARIE of Sicily (1290-[end Apr 1346/Jan 1347]). m firstly (by proxy 9 Feb 1304 in person 1309) Infante don SANCHO de Mallorca, son of don JAIME II King of Mallorca Infante de Aragón & his wife Esclarmonde de Foix (1276-Formiguères, Foix 4 Sep 1324). He succeeded his father in 1311 as SANCHO I King of Mallorca. m secondly (1326) don JAIME III de Ejérica Baron de Ejérica, son of JAIME II de Aragón Baron de Ejérica & his wife doña Beatriz de Lauria Señora de Cocentaina ([11/28] Apr 1335).
      12. PIERRE of Sicily (1292-killed in battle Montecatini, Tuscany 29 Aug 1315).
      13. JEAN of Sicily (1294-Naples 1336, bur Naples).
      14. BEATRICE of Sicily (1295-Andria 1335[808], bur Andria). m firstly (Ferrara Apr 1305) as his second wife, AZZO [VIII] Signore d'Este e Ferrara, son of OBIZZO [II] Marchese d’Este Signore di Ferrara & his first wife Giacobina Fieschi (after 1263-Este 31 Jan 1308, bur Este Santa Tecla, transferred to Ferrara Dominicans). m secondly (before 24 Jan 1309) as his first wife, BERTRAND des Baux Conte d'Andria, Seigneur de Berre, son of BERTRAND des Baux Seigneur de Berre et d'Istres & his wife Berengère Mauvoisin de la Penne (-Naples 1351, bur Naples San Domenico). He was appointed Conte di Montescaglioso in 1309. Grand Justiciar of the Kingdom of Sicily.

      King Charles II had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):
      15. GALEAZZO. Evicted from Tortone by the Marchese di Montferrato 1301.

      ** from Wikipedia listing for Charles II of Naples, as of 10/30/2014
      Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo) (1254 – 5 May 1309) was King of Naples, King of Albania, Prince of Salerno, Prince of Achaea, Count of Provence and Forcalquier and Count of Anjou.

      Biography
      He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

      During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

      In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

      Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

      Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

      The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

      An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Eleanor and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

      He died in Naples in May 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

      Family
      In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:
      Charles Martel of Anjou, titular King of Hungary
      Margaret (1273– 31 December 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil 16 August 1290 to Charles of Valois
      Saint Louis of Toulouse (9 February 1275, Nocera Inferiore – 19 August 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse
      Robert the Wise, King of Naples
      Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople
      Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran 1 November 1295 James II of Aragon
      Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria
      John (1283 – aft. 16 March 1308), a priest
      Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)
      Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – 9 August 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina 17 May 1302 Frederick III of Sicily
      Maria of Naples (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca 20 September 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)
      Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina
      John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293–1336), married 14 November 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)
      Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

      External links
      Wikimedia Commons has media related to Charles II of Naples.
      Armorial of the House Anjou-Sicily (French)

      ** from the World of the Middle Ages (John L. LaMonte) pp 436, 38
      ...An attempt on the part of the Angevins to attack Sicily by sea was averted; Charles, the son and heir of Charles of Anjou, was captured by the Aragonese, and in the ruin of his schemes, Charles of Anjou died in January 1285.

      In 1288 Alfonso agreed to release Charles of Salerno, now Charles II of Naples, whom he held captive, and in 1291 further promised to make James surrender Sicily to Naples. But Alfonso died that same year and James ascended
      the throne of Aragon, appointing his younger brother Frederick governor of Sicily. When in 1295 James in turn agreed to surrender Sicily, the Sicilians resisted and Frederick was proclaimed king of Sicily, which thereafter remained independent of Aragon. Eventually Frederick was recognized as the King of Trinacria (Sicily) in the Treaty of Caltabellotta (1302) and was given the dauggher of Charles II as his wife.

      Charles of Naples ruled uneventfully until 1309, when he died leaving Naples to his son, Robert, and his claims to Hungary (through his wife) to his son, Charles Martel, who was able to make them good.